Jan Campbell and Elma Hurt have a lot in common, and at the top of the list is quilting.

Both avid quilters and active members of the Little Balkans Quilt Guild, they are serving as hosts for "Quilting and Its History," the new quarterly exhibit opening Thursday at the Miners Hall Museum, Franklin.

Jan Campbell and Elma Hurt have a lot in common, and at the top of the list is quilting.

Both avid quilters and active members of the Little Balkans Quilt Guild, they are serving as hosts for "Quilting and Its History," the new quarterly exhibit opening Thursday at the Miners Hall Museum, Franklin.

Both of them began sewing early in 4-H.

"I made my own clothes and my children’s clothing," Campbell said.

In fact, she didn’t start quilting until 16 years ago, after she retired from working for an insurance company.

"I graduated to quilting and never looked back," Campbell said. "I don’t like to make clothes any more."

Her husband, Roland, suggested that she take classes at Labette Community College, Parsons, and she said that opened up a new world for her. Campbell describes herself as a certified fabricaholic, loves 1930s reproductions and batiks, and is partial to bright colors. She also loves traditional quilt patterns, such as log cabin and Iris Chain.

A seamstress since the age of 13 and a longtime quilter, Hurt has been a member of the Little Balkans Quilt Guild since 1994 and has worked at every quilt show sponsored by the guild since that time. She was chairman of the 2008 Little Balkans Days Quilt Show.

Hurt said that she loves the art of quilting and enjoys all aspects of creating new quilts and wall hangings.

Both women have won numerous ribbons from their 4-H days on, including at the Crawford County Fair and the guild shows. Campbell said she has received other good things from quilting as well.

"I especially enjoy the friendships I’ve made in the quilting sisterhood over the years," she said.

Another thing she and Hurt have in common is birds. Hurt has a bluebird housing development at her Pittsburg home, and got Campbell into providing nesting facilities for bluebirds as well.

"Now Jan raises bluebirds, too," Hurt said. "She also feeds many other kinds of birds."

"For years we lived on a farm between Walnut and Hepler," Campbell said. "Three years ago we sold the farm and moved to the Capaldo area. We have woods in back of us and we get a lot of birds."

Right now the two are concentrating on the Miners Hall Museum exhibit, which will open with historical and vintage bed quilts from the 1930s, along with vintage sewing supplies, vintage doll quilts and wall hangings.

Some of the quilts are cherished family heirlooms, including Campbell’s baby quilt.

"It was made by the women at the Methodist Church in Humboldt, and it’s pink satin on one side and blue satin on the other," Campbell said. "It still looks pretty good. I don’t think my mother ever used it."

The quilt show will not remain the same over the next three months. Campbell and Hurt said that some quilts will be taken down and replaced by others. Three special programs are also planned, starting with a trunk show of heirloom quilts at 2 p.m. Jan. 12 by Elaine Huntsinger. Campbell and Hurt will speak on "The Evolution of Quilts" at 2 p.m. Feb. 9. The final program, at 2 p.m. March 15 in celebration of National Quilting Day, will feature demonstrations and displays by Little Balkans Quilt Guild members.