City officials plan to use the Christmas weekend to move everything into the newly renovated City Hall and expect to open up the full building for business on Monday.

City officials plan to use the Christmas weekend to move everything into the newly renovated City Hall and expect to open up the full building for business on Monday.

"There is still some exterior work and some things that need to be done," said Dan Brunetti, Frontenac city administrator. "But 99 percent of the interior is done right now."

The city hall offices will be closed on Friday to help with the move.

The project marks the second half of a two-phase renovation that moved the Frontenac Police Department into the city's Public Safety Center, an expansion to the existing Frontenac Fire Station. That move was completed in October, freeing up workers for the city hall portion of the project.

"It's been great," Brunetti said. "Everybody has been pretty happy with it. There haven't really been any snafus. Anytime you leave a building and move into another building, there's a chance for that to happen."

The police department had been operating out of the old City Hall, which was constructed in 1914, but moved into a building that promised them not only extra space, but also more advanced technology. Once they moved out, the second phase was to renovate that building so that city staff could spill over into a larger space. That should give the city more room for both offices and storage, while doubling the overall space.

"Then we gained the whole second story," Brunetti said. "That was something we needed to help with our file capacity."

The city will install a lift system to help store all its records upstairs. Right now, those records clog the offices of city workers. There are also plans to add convenience for city customers by adding a drive-thru window for bill paying, though Brunetti said that part was probably a month or two away.
The city will also see some financial benefits from the project – the heating and air systems were remodeled, which Brunetti said would knock down the city's utility bills.

He said the project had been a smooth one since its outset.

“We brought an engineering firm to come in and take a look at City Hall because we knew it had been built in 1914," Brunetti said. "But they said structurally, it was very sound. There weren't any problems, and the structure itself was solid. It just needed to be remodeled."

Both parts of the project were paid for by city voters, who approved a bond issue topping $1 million.

"We're tickled and glad to be moving into a new facility," Brunetti said.