When at home, he’s just “Clint,” a married father of three working as a field safety specialist in the oilfields of Minot, N.D.

But on Thursday, he was Staff Sgt. Clinton L. Romesha, Medal of Honor recipient and guest of honor at Pittsburg State.

When at home, he’s just “Clint,” a married father of three working as a field safety specialist in the oilfields of Minot, N.D.
But on Thursday, he was Staff Sgt. Clinton L. Romesha, Medal of Honor recipient and guest of honor at Pittsburg State.
“I’m a simple guy. I was just a guy doing a job that day,” Romesha told a crowd at Pittsburg State’s Veterans Memorial on Thursday.

Medal of Honor
Romesha received the Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama at a ceremony in February for his actions at Combat Outpost Keating in Afghanistan.
The Medal of Honor citation further describes Romesha’s actions on Oct. 3, 2009: “On that morning, Staff Sgt. Romesha and his comrades awakened to an attack by an estimated 300 enemy fighters occupying the high ground on all four sides of the complex, employing concentrated fire from recoilless rifles, rocket-propelled grenades, anti-aircraft machine guns, mortars and small arms fire.”
Romesha was involved with gathering reinforcements, providing reconnaissance, destroyed targets inside and outside the perimeter, directed air support, guided cover fire for injured soldiers, protected the bodies of fallen soldiers, and more, most of which occurred after receiving shrapnel injuries.
During the Medal of Honor ceremony, President Obama quoted Romesha as saying, “We weren’t going to be beat that day. You’re not going to back down in the face of adversity like that. We were just going to win — plain and simple.”

Visit to PSU
When Romesha first heard the invitation to visit Pittsburg State, he told the crowd that he had to seek the town on a map.
The efforts to bring Romesha to Pittsburg were a little more complicated than that. Pat Flynn, assistant professor in PSU’s School of Construction, sought to bring the Medal of Honor winner to the students of Pittsburg State.
“To those of us who are veterans, we understand he got caught working, and got caught working with the highest leadership skills possible. Now he’s putting those skills to use in the workplace. We’re just blessed he’s working in the same field as our program,” Flynn said.
That program is the fledgling environmental and safety management program at Pittsburg State. The program will be an official degree program in the fall after being approved by the Kansas Board of Regents.
Romesha will speak to safety students, but also will speak with students in PSU’s Department of Military Science.
“For the cadets, it’s a great opportunity to talk to someone with recent combat experience,” said Lt. Col. Christopher Lambert, Military Science chairman. “Staff Sgt. Romesha took into combat with young lieutenants, which is what these [cadets] will become.”
As for Romesha’s visit, he said he was impressed by the Veterans Memorial, and was honored by the presence of so many veterans groups at Thursday’s ceremony.
“It’s hard at times to come up and show your feelings,” Romesha said at the ceremony. “In the Army, you have to bury stuff deep. You’ve got the Vietnam veterans, who never got a welcome home, but they work hard to make sure we get ours.”