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Morning Sun
  • Carl Junction Jr. High students unveil first coal bucket art

  • If the full-scale SEK Art Fest is anything like the mini version held Tuesday night at Carl Junction (Mo.) Junior High, then expect a lot of creativity, plenty of colors and amazing interpretations.

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  • If the full-scale SEK Art Fest is anything like the mini version held Tuesday night at Carl Junction (Mo.) Junior High, then expect a lot of creativity, plenty of colors and amazing interpretations.
    Students at Carl Junction Junior High, as well as several other local schools, have been working on their own miniature versions of the coal buckets that will soon adorn the Pittsburg downtown as part of the SEK Art Fest. Tuesday night, the Carl Junction students were the first to unveil the fruits of their labor.
    Steve Robb, SEK Art Fest founder, said that the original idea was for the smaller coal buckets to be made of the same material as the coming large buckets, fiberglass.
    “The price on fiberglass was way out of sight. There was no way we could afford that. We didn’t realize they still make coal buckets. Lacey Taylor got some to use in our first celebration as centerpieces,” Robb told the parents and students gathered for the unveiling on Tuesday night. “I thought they’d be great for our school groups. We said to anyone who wanted to participate that we’d provide the coal buckets.”
    Carl Junction Junior High School was among the first to sign up, and also completed 13 of the 31 planned miniature coal buckets, which will be displayed in downtown store windows soon.
    The connection between Carl Junction and Pittsburg’s SEK Art Fest start with the 7th and 8th grade art teacher, Elizabeth Cosby. Not only does Cosby live in Pittsburg, she was also selected as one of the 26 artists who will be decorating the 4-feet tall versions of the coal buckets.
    “This is great. It’s important that the students see their parent/role model/teacher or whatever working with in their community and establishment. We’re putting into practice what we say. It’s important to be an active artist,” Cosby said.
    Students were broken into teams for the coal bucket project, and typically only four could work on the project at any time, leaving the rest of the class working on other projects before rotating through. The finished products include a multitude of materials, including fake plants, fake butterflies and flowers, acrylic paint, puff paint, tile, glass, mirrors, ribbon, and glitter — lots and lots of glitter.
    It was a project that students were happy to have worked on.
    “I think it was great that they let us in Carl Junction participate in it even though we live in Missouri,” said Kaylah Maynard, 8th grader. “It made us feel part of a bigger community.”
    Maynard said she’d make the drive to Pittsburg to see the buckets — both small and large — on display “as much as possible.”
    Once on display in Pittsburg’s downtown, there will also be a “bucket list” featuring questions from each of the 31 mini coal buckets. If a person answers all the questions and turns them into a designated location, that person can qualify for a gift drawing.
    Page 2 of 2 - Ultimately, Cosby said the project was more than just for Carl Junction or for Pittsburg — it’s about applying the lessons from the classroom in a broader setting.
    “Building relationships in the community and in the school is really important, as well as learning that we can do things outside the classroom,” Cosby said. “Even though we’re in it, we can do things that affect the outside.”
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