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Morning Sun
  • NEWS IN AGRICULTURE: Take time for farm safety

  • As we head in to soybean harvest and wheat planting season, I encourage all farm families to work safely and to take the time to be careful.  This week I’d like to pass along just a few reminders that can help us all deal more safely with some of the hazards associated with farming.

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  • As we head in to soybean harvest and wheat planting season, I encourage all farm families to work safely and to take the time to be careful.  This week I’d like to pass along just a few reminders that can help us all deal more safely with some of the hazards associated with farming.
    Unlike persons employed in other industries, farm families and others working in farming are pretty much their own safety directors.  For this reason, agriculture is among the top occupations for the number of accidental deaths and injuries.  There are many hazards around the farm including dust, chemicals, toxic gases, flying or falling objects, hot surfaces, sharp or cutting objects, loud noises, and many more.
    Safety eyewear, such as safety glasses and goggles, can protect vision from many farm work and farm shop hazards.  Safety glasses with side-shields provide protection in the shop from sparks when grinding, chiseling fragments and other flying objects.  Plastic goggles fit over the eyes (and glasses) and help keep dust, chaff, sprays and chemical splashes from entering the eyes.  Goggles designed for chemicals have hooded vents, while those for protection against particles vent with small perforations in the side shields.  Make sure you use the proper type of eyewear for each application.
    Your lungs also need protection from the airborne health hazards around the farm.  Lung protection devices range from a simple dust mask to those that provide a fresh air supply from a compressed air cylinder.  Choose the device best suited and most practical for a given situation.
    Hands are the most frequently injured part of the body.  During a day’s work, a farmer’s hands might contact agricultural chemicals, fertilizers, solvents, and sharp objects.  They might also be burned, scalded or frostbitten.  Using the appropriate gloves, barrier creams, hand cleaners and lotions will go a long way in protecting your hands.
    These are just a few simple ways that we all know will help protect ourselves against the hazards of farming.  Always remember to be cautious whenever you are around any moving machinery and don’t take any unnecessary chances.  Keep in mind that most farm accidents relate to one cause...someone got in a hurry.  Taking a little extra time for safety now may say you a lot of pain and downtime due to injury later.
    For more information on farm safety or other agricultural topics please feel free to contact Wildcat Extension District agent Scott Gordon in Independence by calling (620) 331- 2690 or by email at sgordon@ksu.edu .  You may also contact Keith Martin in Altamont by calling (620) 784-5337 or by email at rkmartin@ksu.edu . We also offer programs in Family Consumer Science, 4-H and Youth, and horticulture.  Program information and additional contacts can be found on our website www.wildcatdistrict.ksu.edu .
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