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Morning Sun
  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Junk, stuff and the city's trash

  • Dear editor,

    Forty-six years ago, after living in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York City and places in between, I was looking for a sane and comfortable place to spend the rest of my life.

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  • Dear editor,
    Forty-six years ago, after living in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York City and places in between, I was looking for a sane and comfortable place to spend the rest of my life.
    I found it, but at the moment, I am wondering who is orchestrating the trash crisis for Pittsburg, big-city style.
    I live on Langdon Lane just outside both the city limits and the “command” of the city manager. Over the years, three attempts were made to inflict a sewer system on the residents of Langdon Lane under the guise of “progress.” The last attempt, shouted down at a public meeting, was for the sole benefit of a proposed dog track.
    Change is inevitable, slow, and impersonal, but progress tends to involve certain benefits, the question being who gets them.
    Mayor Ketterman says he would “...eliminate loads of stuff on driveways or that get stuck in the garage and people forget about it.” WOW!
    Trash begins as just “stuff,” large or small, that no longer serves a purpose. Relegated to the attic, the basement or a corner of the garage, stuff becomes simply “junk.”
    Residential junk becomes trash only when it gets outside and is an eyesore when exposed to view from the street, the house next door, or low-flying aircraft. What is in someone’s house, garage or storage shed is nobody’s business. Nobody’s. In short, the city’s concerns about trash stop at the door.
    When officialdom initiated a free, periodic citywide trash cleanup, alarming piles of Mayor Ketterman’s stuff appeared along curbsides. The response was so enthusiastic that the program was canceled.
    Hmm.
    William P. Duffy
    Pittsburg
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