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Morning Sun
  • Committed to serve

  • Every life, and every day of life, is a cause of celebration for Sister Ann Meyer, CSJ.



    She recently celebrated her 55th anniversary as a nun with the Sisters of St. Joseph of  Wichita, and is the last member of the order currently working in Pittsburg.

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  • Every life, and every day of life, is a cause of celebration for Sister Ann Meyer, CSJ.

    She recently celebrated her 55th anniversary as a nun with the Sisters of St. Joseph of  Wichita, and is the last member of the order currently working in Pittsburg.

    Sister Meyer does not rejoice in that, but hopes that her continued work in Pittsburg is some extension of  the presence of the hundreds of  Sisters in St. Joseph who did so much to enrich the community for more than a century.

    Teaching was the first work of the order, and the Sisters of St. Joseph arrived in Pittsburg in 1895 to operate an elementary school in Our Lady of Lourdes Parish. In 1903, under the leadership of Mother Bernard Sheridan, the sisters opened Mt. Carmel Hospital, now Via Christi Hospital, the first of many CSJ healthcare ministries.

    Sister Meyer, grew up on a farm south of Pittsburg, not far from the current site of KOAM TV. Her devout parents sent her and her siblings to St. Mary’s High School in Pittsburg.

    “When I was in school I sensed that becoming a nun would really be great, and when I was in high school I thought I really should check it out,” she said. “I went to college at St. Mary’s in Leavenworth, and felt there that I should test it out. When I came home for Easter, I told my parents that I had written to the Sisters of  St. Joseph.”

    The sisters encouraged her to come. She did, and after six months of study she assumed the habit on March 19, 1958. Sister Meyer started teaching elementary school in the San  Francisco Bay area with 50 to 55 students and taught 30 years in California and Kansas, including one year at St. Mary’s Elementary School.

    After that, she spent 20  years in pastoral care, working with those in the later stages of their life journey. Cornerstone Village, now Via Christi Village, opened in April of 2003, and she began there the next month, serving as director of pastoral care.

    Sister Meyer now does electronic scanning for medical records at the Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, and recently received her five-year pin there.

    “I’ve lived in Pittsburg the last 10 years, close to where I grew up,” she said. “I’m able to visit my three brothers and their families every Sunday, and that’s a real blessing.”

    Page 2 of 2 - Sister Meyer enjoys going back over the scrapbook she has compiled of the last 55 years.

    “It’s amazing took look back and see how many blessings I’ve had,”  she said. “I’m a spoiled child of  God.”

    She is sad that fewer young women are choosing a life in religious community.

    “There are challenges and changes, but there are celebrations, too,” Sister Meyer said. “I see the commitment to religious life and serving the Lord as similar to the commitment of  married couples. It’s a bout a commitment to the Lord and being able to serve.”

    She is guided by a statement made by Sister Bernard Sheridan, a comment that Krista Postai, CEO, found so meaningful that she had it printed on cards given to those who work at CHCSEK.

    “Mother Sheridan said to do all the good you can for all the people you can in all the ways you can for as long as you can,” Sister Meyer said. “That’s what I hope to do.”
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