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Morning Sun
  • DABLEMONT: Mushrooms in the snow

  • Last year on the first weekend of May, it was so hot you couldn’t stand to hunt turkeys in a long sleeved shirt.  Must have been 90 degrees or more.  This year on the first weekend of May, it snows almost three inches up here on Lightnin’ Ridge.

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  • Last year on the first weekend of May, it was so hot you couldn’t stand to hunt turkeys in a long sleeved shirt.  Must have been 90 degrees or more.  This year on the first weekend of May, it snows almost three inches up here on Lightnin’ Ridge.
    It melted quickly, and there’s mud and water everywhere, but before it left us, I got some unusual photos of mushrooms sticking up out of the snow here at my place, and bright orange orioles feeding at a snow-encrusted feeder.  I also photographed dogwoods and redbuds with snow on the blossoms.  You can see a half dozen or so of those photos on my website, given at the end of this column.
     Two days before the snow came, I took Gloria Jean over to Truman Lake to look for mushrooms and fish.  But after an hour of searching old dependable places, we only had about ten small morels.  Then on the way back to the boat, beneath a huge sycamore across a swollen creek, I saw a big orange morel.  We crossed the flowing rivulet to get it, and there were about thirty of those huge orange morels sticking up out of the leaf litter.  One of them was unlike anything I have ever seen.  The flattened top was sticking out from underneath a rock the size of a small loaf of bread.  I picked the rock and the mushroom stalk was back several inches under that rock, so far it could never have seen any light.  The tip of the mushroom had grown out from beneath it.  It seemed to be a mushroom trying to escape imprisonment.
    Later that day, while going up a small creek looking for white bass, I found a dozen or so very small grey mushrooms growing out of a sand bar.  There was nothing there but sand, and the mushrooms themselves were so full of sand I couldn’t get them clean.  When we fried them, we could feel the grit of the sand in the mushroom.  The mushrooms were good, but I don’t much care for sand in my teeth, the first time that ever happened.
    My friend Rich Abdoler found about fifty mushrooms that day in a ridge-top cedar glade, without a tree anywhere near but cedars.  People ask me for tips on where to find mushrooms, and I can’t give them any about where they grow, because they grow anywhere and everywhere.  You just have to get out and walk and walk and walk, and look and look and look.  The trouble with our society today is few people can walk that much, or will.  People expect to find them close to roads, and easy.  Sometimes you do, but I’ll bet I walk twenty miles every spring in order to find mushrooms…  and another twenty hunting wild turkeys.
    Page 2 of 2 - I hope some of you folks listen in to my outdoor radio program on Sunday mornings on KWTO 560 AM from 8:06 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. You can also listen on your computer by going to radiospringfield.com. or newstalk560.com  It is a call-in program, and we would like to hear your opinions or comments.  If you have caught a big fish or killed a big gobbler, you may call in and brag about it.
    You can see my ‘snow in May’ photos on my website, www.larrydablemontoutdoors.blogspot.com.  My email address is lightninridge@windstream.net and the mailing address is Box 22, Bolivar, Mo. 65613.
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