|
|
|
Morning Sun
  • Show unites fans of gears, power and tractors

  • Gene Engledow, Bolivar, Mo., believes he’s attended every year of the Antique Gas Engine and Tractor Show at the Crawford County Historical Museum.

    • email print
  • Gene Engledow, Bolivar, Mo., believes he’s attended every year of the Antique Gas Engine and Tractor Show at the Crawford County Historical Museum.
    That’s quite a feat when one considers that the show has reached the quarter-century mark. It’s even more impressive when one considers Engledow attended that first show at age 74.
    “I worked in the space program, and when I retired, I said I wanted to be my own boss, and use my own hands,” Engledow said. “Just seeing something running that hasn’t worked for 15 years is why I do this.”
    That’s kind of the theme of the Antique Gas Engine and Tractor Show — seeing the way iron, gears, belts, pistons and more worked together to make a piece of equipment hum. Not only hum, but whir, kick, pop, chug and more.
    “Kids and the younger generation, from high schoolers and younger, they don’t have any idea why this exists,” said Joe Winter, show director. “They don’t know what it was used for. Most collectors are glad to explain what the gas engine was used for and how it worked.”
    There were many types of devices on display during the two-day show, including cement block makers, tree saws, water pumps, butter churns and more.
    For new vendors, like Ron Gift, Kansas City, Kan., and Barb Robinson, Nevada, Mo., the event was instantly a trip worth making in future years.
    “Everybody is so open to helping everybody,” Robinson said. “These guys are just great. They immediately treat you like family. They’ll say, ‘Make sure you talk with us after it closes,’ or ‘Come up and enjoy coffee and breakfast with us.’ People are friendly, and it’s a good old-fashioned event.”
    Families came out to see the show, including father and son Tad and Luke Price, Baxter Springs.
    “He likes tractors,” Tad said of his 3-year-old son. “It’s a pretty good show. He’s seeing loaders and tractors everywhere.”
    While the swap meet for the local club is in the fall, there was still a lot of buying and selling taking place. Even Engledow, at age 99, bought a pair of engines.
    “Need does not have anything to do with this. If you want something, you get it. For most people our age, you don’t need anything,” Winter said.
    Winter, a former president of the club, was invited to the second ever show, and has been ever since.
    “We didn’t have any idea what would happen when we starteed it. We had three, four, five collectors. We thought if we got together, maybe we could form a club, and then maybe we could have a show,” Winter said. “The objective is to have fun, to meet new friends, and sit around and visit with people you haven’t seen in a while.”

      calendar