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Morning Sun
  • Lakeside students enjoy science fair

  • Want a recipe for a homemade volcano? Cole Niederklein, 6, has a good one.



    He was one of around 40 students taking part in a science fair Thursday night at Lakeside Elementary School.

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  • Want a recipe for a homemade volcano? Cole Niederklein, 6, has a good one.
    He was one of around 40 students taking part in a science fair Thursday night at Lakeside Elementary School.
    The event is a project of the Lakeside PTO, and Brandy Whitesell served as science fair coordinator.
    “Starting out with this, I didn’t know how many kids we’d have participating, but it’s about 40 every year,” she said. “That’s pretty good, especially since it’s not for any class and there’s no extra credit given. We encouraged parents to become involved.”
    As for the volcano, Cole said that it started with a two-liter plastic pop bottle.
    “You spray foam on it, then black paint, then I put some red paint on it,” he said.
    The lava recipe consists of vinegar, baking soda, warm water and six drops of soap.
    “To make it red you put in red Kool-Aid,” he added.
    Making the volcano is a dream come true for the first grader, according to his mother, Jennifer Niederklein.
    “I’m a teacher, and when I taught fourth grade our school had a science fair and my room was the volcano room,” she said. “Since he was 3, Cole has wanted to do a volcano. It was the only project in his mind.”
    Bailee A. Edson, fourth grader, whipped up some green quicksand, using cornstarch, water and green food coloring. She said she wanted to find out if quicksand was a solid or liquid.
    “When I let the mixture flow through my hands it felt thick like a solid,” she reported. “But when I looked at it, it had taken the shape of the bottle it was in like a liquid. I think quicksand is a special kind of liquid.”
    She said that she really enjoyed being in the science fair.
    “Science is one of my favorite subjects,” Bailee said.
    For her exhibit, “Egg-Nertia,” Johanna Walker, second grade, wanted to find out which would be easier to stop spinning, a raw egg or a hard-cooked egg.
    “My hen, Sweet ‘n Sour, who laid both the eggs I used,” she said, pointing to a picture of the hen on her poster.
    One of the eggs was boiled and the other left raw, and Johanna tried spinning them three times. She was surprised to find that the raw egg was much harder to stop than the cooked egg.
    “I think the hard-boiled egg was easier to stop because the liquid in the egg wasn’t moving,” she said.
    Other exhibits included animal tracks, robotics, cleaning pennies with vinegar, creating a “naked egg” by dissolving the shell in vinegar and another volcano.
    Page 2 of 2 - There were no first, second or third places given or prizes awarded. Whitesell said the science fair is not a competition.
    “It’s just an evening of fun, learning and family,” she said.

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