Editor's note: For Dec. 5 publication.


The place may not look like much of an art center, but behind the walls of two buildings facing across the Dartmouth Green at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., visitors will find priceless treasures that span nearly three millennia – some 65,000 works in total.

Editor's note: For Dec. 5 publication.


The place may not look like much of an art center, but behind the walls of two buildings facing across the Dartmouth Green at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., visitors will find priceless treasures that span nearly three millennia – some 65,000 works in total.


In the lower level of Baker-Berry Library, there are powerful and dramatic murals by José Clemente Orozco. The frescos, titled “The Epic of American Civilization,” were painted by the Mexican artist between 1932 and 1934. The ferocity of their themes and their anti-cleric, even anarchistic message created quite a stir when they were unveiled.


Whatever your beliefs, there’s no denying that his vision, imagery, vibrant colors and execution are powerful stuff. These are considered among America’s finest murals.


Across the green at the Hood Museum of Art, in a modern building next to the Hopkins Center for the Arts, visitors are greeted by six larger-than-life Assyrian reliefs of a king and his attendants from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal, built about 900 BC in what is now northern Iraq. Nearby are displays of a variety of artifacts of the ancient world – a painted figure of Osyros, Cypriot pottery dating to the 8th century BC and various Roman works.


The museum’s excellent collection of American art includes paintings by Paul Sample, Maxfield Parrish, Thomas Eakins, Rockwell Kent and Winslow Homer. There is also early silver work and a Gilbert Stuart portrait of Dartmouth’s favorite son, Daniel Webster.


A lot of the art has New England and New Hampshire connections. For instance, a Maxfield Parrish painting, in his early almost photographic style, is of a farm in Windsor, Vt. White Mountain artists and artists in the colonies at Dublin and Cornish, N.H., are well represented.


Most of the rest of the exhibit space is given to traveling shows and changing exhibits from the college’s own collections, with only small space reserved for the museum’s excellent collection of primitive and Native American art.


Both the Hood Museum and Baker-Berry Library are open and free to the public. Hanover is easily accessed from I-89, an easy stop on your way to Woodstock or Vermont ski resorts, including Killington and Sugarbush.


Find more at www.dartmouth.edu/~hood.