A bill in the works within a state senate committee, if passed, could be a thorn in the side of USD 248 and its proposed bond election issues.



But Gary Snawder, USD 248 superintendent, said the bill has little chance of passing.

A bill in the works within a state senate committee, if passed, could be a thorn in the side of USD 248 and its proposed bond election issues.

But Gary Snawder, USD 248 superintendent, said the bill has little chance of passing.

The proposed bill, Senate Bill 20, which was introduced in the State Senate's Ways and Means Committee on Jan. 14, would eliminate state aid for construction bonds between Jan. 1, 2009 and June 30, 2011.

Residents of the Girard USD 248 school district will vote today to accept or reject resolutions that would issue general obligation bonds for some $22 million for remodeling and construction at Haderlein Elementary, Girard Middle School and Girard High School, including the proposed fitness/community center, as well as a new stadium, football field and track. A separate question will be put to the voters, asking for an additional $2,425,000 in bonds for the addition of an indoor swimming pool at the high school.

The state's portion of the project, which is 47 percent, would be eliminated if SB 20 passed. The bill has not yet made it out of committee, thus it has not yet been voted on.

Snawder has had discussions with Gov. Kathleen Sebelius about the bill. Snawder said the governor told him that she thought it was "bad public policy" and that she would not support it.

But Snawder said the district is prepared to adjust its requests if SB 20 did eventually become law.
If voters approve one or both questions in today's bond election, and SB 20 passed, Snawder said the school district would put the brakes on the bond project to prevent "overburdening" the residents of the district.

"We have board members who are aware of what it would do if the state would pull its 47 percent," Snawder said. "They're not going to allow us to let the state make some bad decision and then double up on the taxes. If SB 20 passed, we would adjust what we did or not proceed with it."

Snawder said some people are using talks of the proposed bill as a "scare tactic" to encourage voters to reject the resolutions on today's ballot. However, Snawder does not foresee SB 20 coming to fruition, thus making it, in his opinion, a non-factor. If it does become a legitimate factor, he said the district will act accordingly in response.

"We just need to get (the bond issue) passed, and then we'll make those decisions," he said.