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Morning Sun
  • STITES: Researchers perform soybean foliar fungicide trial

  • Is there any merit to treatment of soybeans with a fungicide in the absence of any obvious disease problems? It goes against logic to think that there would likely be any response to this fungicide application, but stranger things have happened in crop production.

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  • Is there any merit to treatment of soybeans with a fungicide in the absence of any obvious disease problems? It goes against logic to think that there would likely be any response to this fungicide application, but stranger things have happened in crop production.
    Jim Long, retired Crop Variety Development Researcher at the Parsons Research Center at Parsons, and Doug Jardine, Extension Plant Pathologist from K-State, did a two-year study using several different well-known fungicides to determine if the practice mentioned above really would result in increased yields.
    The fungicides included Folicure, Domark, Headline, Quadris and Quilt. The soybean variety used was a group 5. All five of the fungicides listed previously were applied on the beans when they reached the R3 growth stage, which is beginning pod set.  In addition to the R3 stage, Quilt was also used at the R1 stage which is beginning bloom, and at the R5 stage which is pod fill.  A check was used to determine yield without the effect of a fungicide. This trial was done in both 2007 and 2008.  The results were not spectacular. There was no significant increase in yield among all of the fungicide treatments when compared to the yield on the check, even at the more advanced R5 growth stage.
    In another test done by K-State agronomists, Kraig Roozeboom and Stu Duncan, at Belleville and Scandia, Foliar fungicide application resulted in decreased disease incidence by 6-10 percent. However, soybean yield was not affected by foliar fungicide applications.  Soybeans maturity was delayed by one day in June planted beans and 2.5 days in May planted beans.
    So with the lack of a specific target, based on this information, spraying soybeans with a fungicide probably is not justified.  
    Keep in mind, though, that there are a few leaf diseases such as frogeye leaf spot and, of course, soybean rust where a fungicide could give a positive result.  The incidence of severe pressure from these diseases is rare.  However, just because it is rare does not mean that it cannot happen so it is best to keep tabs on developments in the field.
    Hazardous occupation training
    This training is scheduled for Saturday, March 10.  It will be held at the Labette county high school Vo-Ag building in Altamont and will begin at 8 a.m.
    This training is for youth 14 and 15 years old.  It will allow those in this age group to legally operate farm equipment for agricultural employers. There is a fee of $10 for the training.  For more information, please call the Wildcat Extension District office in Altamont at 784-5337 or the Girard office at 724-8233.
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