The Pittsburg office of U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins, R-Kansas, received a death threat Thursday, the same day the congresswoman garnered national attention for saying at a recent town hall meeting that the Republican Party needs a "great white hope."

The Pittsburg office of U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins, R-Kansas, received a death threat Thursday, the same day the congresswoman garnered national attention for saying at a recent town hall meeting that the Republican Party needs a "great white hope."


Press Secretary Mary Geiger confirmed Friday morning that Jenkins' local office at 701 N. Broadway received a death threat via telephone on Thursday. She said the matter has been "turned over to local and federal authorities." Details of the threat are unclear at this time. The Pittsburg Police Department said Friday morning that they are "looking into the incident."


A video surfaced this week showing Jenkins at an Aug. 19 forum in Hiawatha saying that the GOP is looking for a "great white hope" to help stop President Barack Obama's political agenda.


The "great white hope" phrase stems from the early 1900s when there was a campaign to find a white boxer who could defeat heavyweight boxing champion Jack Johnson, who was black.


Geiger said Friday that the person who called in the death threat made reference to Jenkins' comment.


In response to criticism she has received about the comment, Jenkins said she was not referring to someone who could challenge Obama's agenda. Instead, she said she was making a comment about GOP leaders in the House and was trying to reassure Republicans that the party has bright leaders there.


Both she and an aide apologized Thursday if the comment offended anyone. But when she was asked about the remark after a town hall meeting in Ottawa, Jenkins also suggested it had been taken out of context.


"Let's remember the context of this situation," she said. "I don't know how the president got injected into this debate."


Geiger said the death threat will not deter Jenkins from conducting her nearly 30 scheduled town hall meetings across the state.


"The congresswoman is not going to let this caller stop her from getting out and communicating with Kansans," Geiger said.


The Associated Press contributed to this report.