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Morning Sun
  • PATRICK'S PEOPLE: EDW gets new nice grants

  • Every penny counts these days, and the  Early Detection Works program, based at the Crawford County Health Department, has a quite a few more of them to count.



    Stephanie  M. Thompson, RN, Early Detection regional nurse, and Kelly York, regional outreach coordinator, were delighted recently to accept two checks.

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  • Every penny counts these days, and the  Early Detection Works program, based at the Crawford County Health Department, has a quite a few more of them to count.
    Stephanie  M. Thompson, RN, Early Detection regional nurse, and Kelly York, regional outreach coordinator, were delighted recently to accept two checks.
    “Susan G. Komen for the Cure has  given $14,500, payable  to the Crawford County Health Department, for breast health presentations, screening mammography and assistance to the Girard Breast Cancer Support Group,” Thompson said.
    Hope for You gave $3,000 to Early Detection Works for breast services in Crawford, Labette, Bourbon and Cherokee Counties.
    “This money was funded by the sale  of pink ribbon bagels and the Race for Hope,” Thompson said. “Some of it will pay for gas cards for women  so they can drive to get services, and office visits for breast exams. Basically, this can be used for any breast service.”
    Goal of the Early Detection Works program is to reduce death from breast and cervical cancer among the women of Kansas. Program components include education, screening, diagnosis, case management and referral for cancer treatment. The educational part of  the program is directed toward all women in the state.
    The  program also pays for screenings for low income medically-underserved women between the ages of 40 and 64. If screenings detect any abnormalities, Early Detection Works will pay for diagnostic  procedures.
    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Kansas women. According to the Kansas Cancer Registry and Office of Vital statistics, around 2,000 Kansas women will be diagnosed with breast cancer each year, with around 400 related deaths.
    Increasing survival rates depends on early detection, and that’s where education plays a vital role.
    “The biggest thing we’re going to do is educate women about their bodies,” Thompson said. “Know your body, and when you get an ache or anything that’s different and doesn’t subside, tell your doctor.”
    She and York will now be trying to reach even more women.
    “We’ve taken in 14 new counties, which makes 30 counties that we cover,” York said. “We see a lot of potential in that region. It’s never had an outreach worker before, so I’ve got a whole new playground. Concordia and Junction City are the two biggest cities in our new area.”
    The two recently made a car trip to visit their new counties to get acquainted with the people and communities there.
    “We spent a night at the Midlands Hotel in Wilson,” York said. “It’s a lovely place, but it’s supposed to be haunted.”
    Her only spooky experience there was with an old alarm clock.
    “It didn’t tick, but it  went off the next morning,” York said.
    Page 2 of 2 - Thompson, on the other hand, may or may not have had an encounter with a ghost cat, but didn’t let it get to her. She was far more concerned with living people than ghosts.
    “We find women who need our services in the strangest ways,” she said. “In Bellville we stopped to use a restroom and we met a woman who had no health insurance and hadn’t had a mammogram in five years. And we met with so many nice people on our trip. We really look forward to putting our grant to use.”
    The funds will help further her own cherished goal.
    “I want to kick cancer to the curb,” Thompson said.
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