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Morning Sun
  • Sisney: Cures for the summertime blues

  • What do you do to beat the summertime heat? I undoubtedly led the league in snow cone consumption this summer, regardless of how one spells “snow cone.” I have been a menace at the concession stands or the portable vendors, looking for a Slush Puppie or a snow cone. I favor cherry cola, fol...
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  • What do you do to beat the summertime heat?
    I undoubtedly led the league in snow cone consumption this summer, regardless of how one spells “snow cone.” I have been a menace at the concession stands or the portable vendors, looking for a Slush Puppie or a snow cone. I favor cherry cola, followed by cherry and grape, then kiwi strawberry and blue raspberry; blue raspberry edges way too far on the sickly sweet side of the ledger.
    My girlfriend’s son and I walked over to JayCee Ballpark every morning in early June for the Mike Watt Fundamental Baseball Camp and three hours later — after talking baseball and media with my former professor Mark Arbuckle — I would drive my girlfriend’s son across town for snow cones as reward for his effort on the field. Baseball cards and snow cones . . . what motivation for a 9-year-old boy!
    Over the course of the summer, I have once again become a snow cone junkie. Anything with ice seems to work just fine during this part of the year, however, and in July and August one doesn’t get overly picky.
    When people complain too much about summertime weather, I mention that it’s summer and it’s supposed to be hot. I’d be more worried if we got a winter storm in July rather than 100 degree temperatures.
    Granted, I was not in Hill City recently when the high temperature reached 115 degrees, highest mark in Kansas and the entire United States that day. For a five-day stretch in late June, Hill City led the nation in heat and in Kansas, everybody knows that it’s not the heat so much as it’s the combination of heat and humidity that can make life seem miserable.
    My girlfriend (as well as her two sons) and I have minor disagreements over air conditioning. I believe that it should be run inside the house when temperatures reach 100 anytime of the year and throughout July and August. Otherwise, ceiling fans should work. My girlfriend likes to say, “We don’t have to be miserable just because you’re not.”
    I’ve never driven a car very long with a functional air conditioner — 1974 Mercury Comet, 2001 Buick Regal and 1993 Chevy Caprice, sooner or later they’ve all gone kaput. It gets so hot sometimes entering my 1993 Chevy Caprice that I have to handle the seatbelt with gloves used less often during winter. Touch anything metal on my car and expect an instantaneous flash of boiling heat.
    I roll down both front windows, sometimes only the driver side if papers start blowing around too much on the passenger side, especially since I had a parking pass for Arrowhead Stadium fly out during football season. I remember being a little kid and riding around the backroads with my grandpa or my uncles, who always cracked the windows and never used air conditioning, partly because they drove vehicles without air conditioning.
    Page 2 of 2 - Air conditioning is defined as the removal of heat from indoor air for thermal comfort. No offense to pioneers such as Chinese inventor Ding Huan, British scientist and inventor Michael Faraday and American engineer and inventor Willis Carrier, I sometimes wonder if the human race would not be better off without air conditioning seemingly everywhere. Now, we have an expectation for air conditioning everywhere we go, even if we’re not inside. We all want that control of our climate.
    During the summer, I have a greater respect for baseball players, construction workers, et cetera, all the men and women that work outdoors everyday. If you have ever stepped on the field at JayCee Ballpark on a hot summer day, you understand.
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