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Morning Sun
  • OUR VIEW: Lessons learned from Sandusky trial

  • The final chapter has not yet been written in the case of Jerry Sandusky, but a sense of closure has started to come to the proceedings.



    Friday, a jury found former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky guilty of 45 counts, consisting of sexually abusing 10 boys over a 15-year period.

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  • The final chapter has not yet been written in the case of Jerry Sandusky, but a sense of closure has started to come to the proceedings.
    Friday, a jury found former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky guilty of 45 counts, consisting of sexually abusing 10 boys over a 15-year period.
    Since the news about the original grand jury on Sandusky began to leak out, the reaction by the public has been equal parts shock, horror, rage and disgust.
    Although Sandusky has been found guilty and will certainly spend the rest of his life behind bars, that doesn’t mean the public’s involvement in this case is coming to an end. As much as we wish this whole saga was no longer in the news, it is important to take something from the terrible nature of this case.
    The first lesson to be learned is that monsters do exist. There are predators; there are those who would do unspeakable things to children.
    The second lesson is that these monsters can be anyone. They can be famous, they can be charming, they can fool even the best of people. They can be anywhere.
    The third lesson is also difficult: Even monsters can do good, while hiding their evil. From many reports, The Second Mile has done some amazing things for children. Many lives have been impacted through the Sandusky-created organization. Unfortunately, this group was also used by Sandusky during his predation on boys.
    The fourth lesson is also chilling. Abuse can happen even within a family. Reports surfaced last week that the adopted son of the Sanduskys was prepared to testify that he, too, was abused. This has not been proven in court, but the accusation exists.
    These four lessons are frightening. If abuse can be anywhere, be anyone, be concealed and even be within the family, then what can be done?
    That’s where the fifth and most important lesson comes into play: We, the public, must remain vigilant.
    Mike McQueary, then a graduate assistant, spotted Sandusky in the showers with a child and brought it, in some phrasing or another, to the attention of his superiors at Penn State, including legendary head coach Joe Paterno.
    McQueary was not the only one to have noticed something amiss about Sandusky. Mothers and family members raised their own concerns to law enforcement.
    The public can’t think that monsters like Sandusky don’t exist or aren’t nearby or aren’t active. A visit to the local courts proves those theories wrong.
    Monsters exist. It is up to us, the public, to fight them. Although it was a bit late, the Sandusky case proved that monsters can be fought.
    — The Morning Sun

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