Kansas Workers Compensation Act provides that workers injured on-the-job should receive benefits based upon two-thirds of their wage for the resulting disability.

Dear Editor 
Kansas Workers Compensation Act provides that workers injured on-the-job should receive benefits based upon two-thirds of their wage for the resulting disability.
However, injured workers with higher paying jobs do not receive a full two-thirds of their wages, because Kansas imposes a maximum benefit rate based upon 75% of the state average wage, currently $529 per week — among the lowest in the nation, far lower than surrounding states:  Iowa  $1,366, Colorado $786, Missouri $772, Nebraska $644, Oklahoma $577.
Kansas is one of only a handful of states where workers who are permanently, totally disabled do not receive lifetime disability benefits.  Since 1987, Kansas has capped compensation at $125,000—4.54 years of benefits at the current maximum rate.  To keep up with growth in wages over the past 21 years, the cap would need to be $258,324, according to a study by the Institute for Policy & Social Research at Kansas University
Workers who are partially disabled likewise do not receive compensation for the duration of their disability.  Kansas caps such compensation at $100,000—3.64 years of benefits.  This limit needs to be raised to $206,659 to keep up with wages, according to the study.
A century ago, at the dawn of the industrial age, Kansas led the way.  In 1911, Kansas enacted workers compensation legislation to protect workers and their families from the devastating economic impact of disabling on-the-job injuries.  We have not kept the faith.  Our workforce is no longer adequately protected.
Thanks
Timothy A. Short
Pittsburg