At Monday night’s forum, candidates for the Frontenac City Council lauded the fact that the city’s taxes were among the lowest in the region.

At Monday night’s forum, candidates for the Frontenac City Council lauded the fact that the city’s taxes were among the lowest in the region.
On April 7, Frontenac voters will have a chance to vote for or against something that City Administrator Dan Brunetti said directly contributed to the low taxes.
“There’s no doubt that the half-cent sales tax affects that,” Brunetti said. “If you take that half-cent sales tax out, you’re talking about 10 mills in property tax that it would take to replace that money.”
The sales tax measure was approved by voters back in 1999 and has been utilized by the city to fund parks and recreation and water and sewer projects, as well as capital improvements within the city. The vote would be to renew that half-cent sales tax.
“This isn’t a new tax that we’re bringing up,” Brunetti said.
According to Frontenac City Clerk Doug Sellars, the half cent sales tax averages about $22,000 per month, or more than $250,000 annually to the city’s budget.
“This funding is critical to Frontenac’s continued success,” Brunetti said.
Brunetti also pointed to the fact that the city’s sales tax rate is the same for the surrounding area including Pittsburg, Girard and Arma.
“This type of tax is appealing to most because the citizens recognize that you’re allowing those that shop in Frontenac to assist with our improvements,” Brunetti said. “It’s the fairest way to do it because you’re taxing what people are purchasing.”
The largest portion of the sales tax is generated from the businesses along US 69 corridor, Brunetti said.
In the event voters do not pass the continuation of the sales tax, then the tax would sunset, or expire, at midnight on Dec. 31. Brunetti said the city would then be forced to consider drastically increasing the mill levy or making substantial cuts in existing services.
“In the past the community has always been very supportive of the city’s needs and we are hopeful that we will continue to receive their support,” Brunetti said.