He’s got no name other than 101, but the registered Brahman bull from the M&L Dicus Ranch, Steelville, Mo., is a celebrity on the farm show circuit and has been getting lots of attention at the Four State Farm Show.

He’s got no name other than 101, but the registered Brahman bull from the M&L Dicus Ranch, Steelville, Mo., is a celebrity on the farm show circuit and has been getting lots of attention at the Four State Farm Show.

So have the Brahmousins from Rankin Farms, Buffalo, Mo., and the Angus bulls from Zagar Angus Farm, Girard.

“We’ve been doing registered Angus breeding stock for 54 years and we’re one of the oldest exhibitors at the farm show,” said Frank Zagar. “We always have this same spot.”

He said that the bulls were holding up well in the heat.

“They’re comfortable and the heat doesn’t seem to bother them at all,” Zagar said. “It’s a hot day, but it’s a little breezy here.”

The heat certainly wasn’t bothering 101.

“Brahmans will not melt in the sun,” said Phyllis Galbraith, who operates the M&L Dicus Ranch with husband Dean Galbraith. “101 is out here, there’s no shade and he’s out here just loving life.”

That cooling ability has been passed on to the Brahmousins, a cross that is three-eighths Brahman and five-eighths Limousin.

“The dewlap under the chin is Brahman air conditioning,” said Butch Rankin.

Galbraith said that the Brahman’s distinctive hump also aids in keeping the animals cool.

Rankin brought one of his bulls and three heifers, including Pinky.

“She’s the start of a new bloodline,” he said. “She’s a purebred Brahmousin. This breed is 35 or 36 years old, but the folks who started them got older and their kids left the farms, went to the city, liked the concrete and asphalt and made better money.”

Around 12 years ago people like Rankin started trying to revive the Brahmousin breed.

“We aren’t no prairie fire, but there are 10 or  12 more people who are breeding them,” he said.

Rankin said that his cattle will get to go back to their open range after the farm show.

“About December the heifers will see a boyfriend,” he said.

101 will make an appearance at the Ozark Farm Fest and the National Brahman Show in Dallas in October, then he’ll get back to  his stud duties.

“We’ll be collecting semen, we’ll bring in some cows and 101 will live his life,” Galbraith said.

Brahman cattle aren’t the only thing she breeds at the ranch. She also brought along Roxie and Zeke,  12-week-old puppies.

Youngsters especially enjoyed petting the fuzzy puppies, but Galbraith said that these will grow up to be working dogs.

“They are a cross between border collies and Australian shepherds,” Galbraith said. “Those are both herding breeds, and we breed them to work cattle. We brought them to generate some interest in our cow dogs. They’re going to the fair in two weeks, and we thought they needed a dry run to see if they could travel.”