They worked long, hard hours and, in the end, things didn’t go the way they wanted them to. However, Raymond Glaser and Kenneth Lollar still want to reminisce about the old days with fellow employees who worked at the old Dickey Clay Co.

They worked long, hard hours and, in the end, things didn’t go the way they wanted them to. However, Raymond Glaser and Kenneth Lollar still want to reminisce about the old days with fellow employees who worked at the old Dickey Clay Co.

The event is set at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 5 at Chicken Annie’s Annex.

Founded as the Pittsburg Paving Brick Company in 1899, the business later became known as the Pittsburg Sewer and Conduit Pipe Company, was sold to Walter S. Dickey around 1910 and today is known as Mission Clay. Though the name has undergone several changes, the business, based on high quality Pittsburg clay, has remained on East Fourth Street.

Glaser started work there in 1955, and Lollar followed a few months later in 1956.

“We did common labor,” Glaser said. “The wages were $2.92 per hour for that. There was some contract work where you could make more money, but it was a lot more work.”

“A top electrician or machinist’s wages were $3.88 an hour,” Lollar added.

That doesn’t sound like much, but they got by.

“Back then, we didn’t think we had to have two television sets and four cars,” Glaser said. “I feel sorry for young people trying to start out today. I don’t think people know how to handle being poor today.”

The end for Glaser and Lollar at Dickey Clay, and for many others as well, came when the employees went out on strike.
“The strike was in 1975, and we lost it,” Glaser said. “After that, we all scattered.”

After the strike, Lollar worked 20 years as a heavy machine operator at List and Clark.

“I went out as a pipefitter to the Kansas Ammunition Plant at Parsons,” Glaser said.

Lately, the two had started thinking about getting up a reunion, and started by getting a roster listing 238 employees.

“We passed the list around to some people and asked them to check off everybody who they knew had gone off to the big reward,” Glaser said. “We came up with a list of 97 people who might still be alive, but not guaranteed. Our part is to get together with those that are still alive.”

Anyone needing additional information can contact Glaser at 231-7349 or Lollar at 231-2305. However, reservations are not required to attend the reunion.

“People can just come on out, eat chicken and visit,” Glaser said. “They can bring their wife or their girlfriend, but they probably shouldn’t bring both.”