That wireworms can be a serious threat to crop production because they can sometimes occur in numbers that can significantly reduce stands in corn and milo. The thing that farmers should know is that wireworms  have life cycles that lasts for several years. 

That wireworms can be a serious threat to crop production because they can sometimes occur in numbers that can significantly reduce stands in corn and milo. The thing that farmers should know is that wireworms  have life cycles that lasts for several years.  

This means that if you have problem this year, then there is a good chance the problems will crop up again next year or the next year.  Knowing this, it should be a policy to make sure the seed you are protecting your crop from potential wireworm loss.  In furrow insecticides or insecticide seed treatments can both be effective.

Since we are growing so much corn in our area the likelihood of a farmer planting corn in the same field in consecutive years is increasing.  Of course, common sense dictates that maybe some problems could arise from this practice.  Corn root worms are one of those problems.  Normally, root worms would not be a problem until the third year of consecutive corn crops and it is not that likely that a farmer would do this.  However, if, for some reason,  you are planting corn for the third consecutive year in the same field, you need to use a soil applied insecticide or a seed treatment that is labeled for root worms.  Remember that crop rotation is the surest way to avoid this and many other problems as well.

Dodder in lespedeza can sometimes be a problem.  Dodder is an annual that grows from seed each year.  Knowing this, it becomes clear that there has to be a seed source.  In a lot of cases, the seed source is the lespedeza the farmers scatters in his wheat in the spring.  

The dodder is hard to clean out of lespedeza seed.  

This means if you have dodder in lespedeza one year, then this seed will have dodder the next year and will reseed your problem from one year to the next.  Don’t use dodder infested seed.  Dodder infested lespedeza should be cut as hay and not for seed.

Potash deficiency can show up in fields that have been newly broken out of alfalfa or red clover.  This is because as the hay crops are removed there are large amounts of plant nutrients removed with the hay.  In many cases, the fertilizer applications have not kept pace with the rate of removal of these important crop nutrients.   It is wise to fertilize these fields with both phosphorous and potash before planting the next crop.

This should prevent this problem from occurring.  On the flip side, both red clover and alfalfa have the ability to fix large amounts of nitrogen, so that there is the potential for reducing nitrogen applications in subsequent corn or milo.  

Don’t overdo that though because nitrogen deficiency is the biggest single yield reducer in our crops.