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Morning Sun
  • PATRICK'S PEOPLE: Stacy Burns is selling fudge for a purpose

  • Some artists create their masterpieces in oils or watercolors or clay. Stacy Burns, Cherokee, works in fudge.



    “I’ve been making fudge since 2002,” she said. “I’ve developed my own recipes and have about 45 different flavors.”

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  • Some artists create their masterpieces in oils or watercolors or clay. Stacy Burns, Cherokee, works in fudge.
    “I’ve been making fudge since 2002,” she said. “I’ve developed my own recipes and have about 45 different flavors.”
    That includes pumpkin pie fudge, lemon meringue fudge, white chocolate amaretto, peanut butter, maple, cherrymash white chocolate raspberry and, of course, the standard chocolate fudge.
    “If you can imagine it, I can probably build it,” Burns said. “People can come and ask for custom-made fudge. One woman said, ‘What about cookies and cream fudge?’ I said, ‘Well, of course’.”
    She said that she first began selling her fudge out of the Home Cafe, the restaurant her parents  operated in Cherokee for many years.
    “My parents, Joe and Carolyn Burns, bought the restaurant when I was 9, and I grew up in that restaurant,” Burns said. “I worked there from the time I was 14 until 2004, when my folks sold it. I was a waitress, dishwasher, cook, whatever needed to be done.”
    So why did she decide to make fudge her art form?
    “I have 32 sweet teeth,” Burns said. “And it’s different. If you’re going to a party or a dinner, everybody takes cookies. Why not take a plate of fudge instead?”
    She had a table at the recent Cherokee Homecoming, and has been thinking about participating in some area farmers markets.
    A 1991 Southeast High School graduate, Burns attended Pittsburg State University. She is a single mom to Reuben, 3, Victoria, 4, and Sarah, 5.
    “I thought having a home-based business would be something I could do and still care for my children,” she said.
    Her mother died in March, but her father, who served 25 years as Cherokee police chief, helps with the children.
    Burns is making fudge for a very special reason that stems from a trip she made to India several years ago.
    “From 2005 to 2006 I lived in India and loved it,” she said. “I went there first as a missionary. I felt a calling and it’s still there.”
    Her dream now is to return to India with two of her friends and open an orphanage.
    “There are over 7 million orphans in India, and in Delhi, where we would be located, there are probably 750,000 orphans,” she said. “There’s never been a count of the street people that I know of, but you see 15 or 20 people living in a one-room apartment. We’d also have a soup kitchen to feed the street people. I want to feed people. I definitely get that from my mother.”
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