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Morning Sun
  • DABLEMONT: One Last Fishing Trip

  • My Uncle Bryce, Aunt Betty and their son Dennis came up from Arkansas for one last fishing trip a week or so ago while it was still warm.  Sondra Gray, editor of Lightnin’ Ridge Publications and Rich Abdoler, a friend who writes for my magazine, joined us, figuring there were not going to be many more 70 degree ...
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  • My Uncle Bryce, Aunt Betty and their son Dennis came up from Arkansas for one last fishing trip a week or so ago while it was still warm.  Sondra Gray, editor of Lightnin’ Ridge Publications and Rich Abdoler, a friend who writes for my magazine, joined us, figuring there were not going to be many more 70 degree days the remainder of this year.  We put a pair of 19-foot Grumman canoes in the river, and fished with spinner baits, and jigs adorned with rubber crayfish.  Both produced a few bass.  Rich caught six nice Kentucky bass on a white spinner.
    A year ago, Sondra got a special fishing rod for Christmas, a custom made light rod with spinning reel which is made for 6 pound line, and best used for white bass, crappie, trout, and walleye and bass less than four pounds in weight. I told her this summer that when she fishes for bass, she should be using a stronger rod and a fast retrieve medium action spinning reel which will hold ten or twelve pound line, but Sondra really likes that light outfit, and she catches a lot of fish on it.  She decided to try a little Rapala deep running crankbait, and in little time she hooked and landed a walleye and a bass which were both around 2 pounds.  In mid-afternoon, in deep and shady water, she bent the rod hard and exclaimed that she was hung up on something, a log or rock perhaps.  It was then I saw the line slowly moving toward mid-river, and I told her I didn’t think she was hung up, except on the jaw of a pretty good-sized fish.  For awhile she didn’t believe me, and then she watched it move, and lunge the tip of that rod.
    Sondra has landed some bass in excess of four pounds on that light outfit, but nothing larger.  What she had that afternoon was likely 3 times larger than anything she has caught on it.  I was thinking she had a really large bass or walleye, listening to that drag whine as the fish took more than he gave.  Sondra gave it her best, but fifteen minutes later she was worn down more than the fish was.  With the rod handle tucked under her armpit, and her wrists tiring, she finally had an idea why I suggested using a stronger rod at times.
    Finally, she got the big fish close enough to see in the clear water, and it was a huge channel catfish, about 12 pounds or so.  The fish saw the boat, saw the net, and gave it a hard long lunge with not much line out.  It snapped, and Sondra looked like she could cry.  But I told her she had done a great job of fighting it, and it was a lot more his fault than hers.  But to really get her back to a semblance of ‘happy again’, I had to tell her that I had never once ate a big catfish out of that river that didn’t taste like mud and wet leaves.
    Page 2 of 2 - The end result is she will soon have two sizes of fishing rods, one to use when there’s big fish to be caught.
    Tune in on Sunday mornings to KWTO AM radio, 560 on the dial, to listen to my grizzled old outdoorsman radio program, from 8 to 9 a.m.  It is a call-in program, and we would love to hear from readers who have questions, comments or opinions.
    My address is Box 22, Bolivar, Mo. 65613 and the email address is lightninridge@windstream.net .  My website is www.larrydablemontoutdoors.blogspot.com
     

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