Many people are fortunate to have their epilepsy well controlled by medication. Alishia Faucett, 16, Pittsburg, is not one of them, and continues to have seizures daily.

Many people are fortunate to have their epilepsy well controlled by medication. Alishia Faucett, 16, Pittsburg, is not one of them, and continues to have seizures daily.

A benefit  baked potato bar to help with her medical expenses will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday at the First Church of the Nazarene.
Free-will donations will be accepted.

Tina Faucett, Alishia’s mother, said that doctors are looking at various options to bring her seizures under control.

“We’re kind of drained going back and forth to doctors in St. Louis and Kansas City,” Faucett said. “They were talking about doing surgery. The first surgery she had took care of the seizures about nine months, but now she’s having cluster seizures, and her seizures can last 10 to 15 minutes.”

Faucett said that her daughter has had problems since birth.

“She was seven weeks early, and a part of her brain is missing,” she said.

Doctors have told her that futher surgery could have serious side effects, depending on what part of the brain is affected.

“It could cause her to have to learn how to walk again and lead to permanent paralysis on her right side,” Faucett said. “Or she might not be able to talk and would have to learn sign language all over again. She knows a little all ready. But the doctors are now saying they want to wait six months to a year before surgery.”

She’s hoping that a new option will be successful and perhaps spare her daughter from surgery.

“There’s a new type of medicine that’s being used in Canada and they’ve had a lot of success with it there,” Faucett said. “It’s just been approved for use in the United States.”

For now, her life revolves largely around caring for Alishia’s needs.

“Alishia enjoys swinging and playing outside, but her puppy dogs are it,” Faucett said. “I work odd jobs, I mow lawns and clean houses so that I can fit my hours around taking care of  her. There are baby-sitters who come in, and her father, James Faucett, will come over and sit with her. I’ve already prepared myself  to stay home with her 24/7 if she does have to have surgery.”