Ron Marrone, co-owner of Marrone’s Inc., credits the Boy Scouts of America with crafting him into who he is today. At a luncheon he helped host on Friday, Marrone spoke about his childhood, and how scouting helped his family after his mother died when Marrone was in the second grade.

Ron Marrone, co-owner of Marrone’s Inc., credits the Boy Scouts of America with crafting him into who he is today. At a luncheon he helped host on Friday, Marrone spoke about his childhood, and how scouting helped his family after his mother died when Marrone was in the second grade.

He said that his father was left with three of the “orneriest boys in Crawford County, in the whole state of Kansas. And he put us in scouting.”

“I can’t express how important scouting is,” he said at the luncheon. It makes great leaders and great people. There is a lot of testimony to that. You’re not going to get everyone to be that way, but if you just get a couple of them, you’ve done your job.”

Friday’s luncheon was a fundraiser for the Friends of Scouting, who annually support roughly 20 percent of the Ozark Trails Council’s annual revenue. Many members of the crowd were former scouts themselves, and the luncheon included members of the MoKan District Committee.

“We came up with a figure that it costs $235 per boy for each year of the scouting program,” said Mo Kan District Executive Jared Alexander. “That pays for the uniform, the program, the materials. Individuals, companies, and others can donate, and it’s really at their discretion. Any little bit helps to promote the program to as many kids as possible.”

The roughly two dozen individuals at the Friends of Scouting luncheon helped to raise at least $5,075 in just one meal.

That will be helpful for many of the students in the Mo Kan District, including Casey Steinmiller, an Eagle Scout from Troop 81, who spoke at the luncheon.

Steinmiller has been fortunate, he said, to have been able to go to many of scouting’s top destinations, including Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico, Northern Tier National High Adventure Program in Minnesota and the Florida National High Adventure Sea Base.

“One of the proudest moments of my life was when I received my Eagle last December,” Steinmiller said. “For my Eagle project, we built display dollies for the Crawford County Historical Museum. People are impressed when they hear I am an Eagle Scout, because it shows I’m dedicated to what I do. Scouting has made such an impact on my life. I hope to be active in scouts for the rest of my life.”

Andrew Nash can be reached at andrew.nash@morningsun.net or by calling 231-2600 ext. 140.