In response to an audit that found numerous questionable transactions at Kansas State University, the state Board of Regents may take a greater oversight role of athletics at all six state universities.

In response to an audit that found numerous questionable transactions at Kansas State University, the state Board of Regents may take a greater oversight role of athletics at all six state universities.


At a meeting in Topeka on Thursday, the nine-member board will discuss requiring the state's four-year universities — the University of Kansas, Kansas State, Wichita State, Pittsburg State, Emporia State and Fort Hays State — to undergo regular audits of their athletic departments, something that was never done in the past.


One regent, Topeka attorney Dan Lykins, said he senses support for the idea.


"I'm only one vote. But I think there's a very good possibility that it will happen," Lykins told The Associated Press on Wednesday. "The way I look at it, it's not because of K-State, but because of good business management that we need to do that."


Currently, the board has annual audits of the schools' academic performance, and sometimes withholds state funds when standards are not met. But athletic departments at the larger schools, including Kansas State and the University of Kansas, have not been included in those reviews because they are separate corporations.


"We just assumed the presidents would keep us up to date on anything we need to know," said Lykins.


The regents traditionally have conducted more extensive audits after presidents leave schools, and Kansas State's former president, Jon Wefald, resigned earlier this month, prompting the board's recent audit.


That audit, released Friday, detailed conflicts of interest in the operation of a business incubator at the school and raised questions about how employees in the athletics department were paid. It showed 13 payments totaling $845,000 to newly rehired football coach Bill Snyder, former athletic director Tim Weiser and Bob Krause, a former vice president for institutional advancement and former athletic director. The audit said those payments had no supporting documents.


Kansas State administrators sent an e-mail to about 55,000 people late Tuesday defending Snyder.


"Of course, as K-State's most prominent figure, the mentions of Coach Snyder in the audit document have been disproportionately covered in the media and are therefore painful for him and his family," said the e-mail, which was addressed to "Kansas State Alumni and Friends" and signed by university President Kirk Schulz and athletic director John Currie.


"In our opinion, there are no grounds to even begin to insinuate that Coach Snyder has ever benefited improperly from his relationship with K-State," the e-mail said.


Snyder said in a statement released during the weekend that he has never received any inappropriate compensation.


Neither he nor Schulz returned messages seeking comment Wednesday, and school officials said both were traveling.


Weiser, now an official in the Big 12 office, has said he was never paid anything that was not owed to him by Kansas State and that all payments were made through proper channels.


Krause, Wefald's right-hand man for 30 years, left the university last month and has not made any public comment. Krause quit the day that the school revealed what it called a "secret deal" to funnel more than $3 million in deferred compensation to former football coach Ron Prince. The university has filed a lawsuit contesting the agreement, which former President Jon Wefald contends was brokered by Krause without his knowledge.


Snyder, who was the Wildcats football coach from 1989-2005, returned after Prince was fired last year. During his earlier stint at Kansas State, he compiled a a 136-68-1 record at a school that had had won just 130 games during the previous 51 years. He is so revered at the school that it changed the name of its stadium to Bill Snyder Family Stadium.