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Morning Sun
  • TRUE STORIES: Coming and going in March

  • This column originally appeared March 15, 1999. Comes in like a lion … goes out like a lamb.” “No, no, no. That’s not the way I always heard it. It’s ‘Comes in like a lamb … goes out like a lion.’” ...
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  • This column originally appeared March 15, 1999.
    Comes in like a lion … goes out like a lamb.”
    “No, no, no. That’s not the way I always heard it. It’s ‘Comes in like a lamb … goes out like a lion.’”
    “That’s not right.”
    “How much do you wanna bet?”
    “There’s no sense bettin’. You never pay me anyhow.”
    “That’s because I never lose.”
    “Yeah, right.”
    So went a conversation between my wife and I while we walked together one balmy evening as the sun went a-wearyin’ west. Both of us cocksure we were right — and the other wrong.
    Our bickering continued even after we got home.
    “I can’t believe you think it could actually be ‘Comes in like a lion, goes out like a lamb.’ Why would anyone make up a saying to describe the obvious? No, it’s gotta’ be ‘March comes in like a lamb, goes out like a lion.’”
    “Okay Mr. Know-It-All. Let’s call somebody and ask.”
    “Good idea. How ‘bout Jan O’Connor?”
    “You gonna’ call or me?”
    “You’re the one anxious to prove yourself wrong. You do it.”
    I confidently picked up the phone and punched in the number. She stood unabashed by the kitchen sink and listened, a smile of condescension already starting across her face.
    “Mostly Books,” Jan proclaimed on the other end.
    “Jan, J.T. Knoll. Linda and I are having a little, uh, discussion and we need some clarification.
    She chuckled knowingly. “I’ll do what I can.”
     “It’s about the March saying about the lamb and the lion. How does it go?”
    “Well, if it comes in like a lion, it goes out like a lamb. And if it comes in like a lamb, it goes out like a lion.”
    I fell silent for a few moments as I gathered myself. “Ohh … yeah … that’s right. It’s a contingency.”
    “Yep.”
    I told her (sheepishly) about our debate.
    “Well, I guess you’re both right,” she said — causing a little of the egg on my face to fall away. We visited a little before I hung up and turned back to Linda.
     “Jan said ... “
     “Yeah, I heard,” she interrupted with a whimsical smile.
     We laughed ... shook our heads ... then laughed some more. I walked to the west window. “Come look at the sky. It’s turning crimson.”
    She joined me and we shared a breath.
     “Red sky at night, things are alright.”
    “No. I think that’s’ supposed to be ‘Red sky at night …’”
    Page 2 of 2 -  “Don’t start!”
     
    J.T. Knoll is a writer, speaker and prevention and wellness coordinator at Pittsburg State University. He also operates Knoll Training, Consulting & Counseling Services in Pittsburg. He can be reached at 231-0499 or jtknoll@swbell.net

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