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Morning Sun
  • EDITORIAL: Recognizing our heroes important this weekend

  • With “The Avengers” breaking records and the one-year anniversary of the Joplin tornado, the word “heroism” has been bandied about lately.



    Heroism is when one puts his or her own life at risk for the lives of others. Wearing brightly-colored tights may help on the big screen, but that’s entirely unnecessary in the real world.

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  • With “The Avengers” breaking records and the one-year anniversary of the Joplin tornado, the word “heroism” has been bandied about lately.
    Heroism is when one puts his or her own life at risk for the lives of others. Wearing brightly-colored tights may help on the big screen, but that’s entirely unnecessary in the real world.
    Heroism is a word that shouldn’t be used lightly. Sports figures are not heroes for making a last-second shot or hitting an RBI in a tense situation. No one should be looked up to as a hero for simply being famous or for winning a “reality” television show.
    It’s because of the word’s use in situations like these that one becomes desensitized, even when the word is used in its proper context. And it’s too bad that real heroes are lumped in with singers, athletes and movie stars.
    So we want to take a moment to identify some real heroes — the type that exemplify the word rather than ruin its meaning.
    The first example comes from Monday evening, when Joe Curran “saved two lives,” according to Crawford County Sheriff Sandy Horton.
    Reports indicate Curran and his wife, Kim, stopped after seeing a car ahead of them crash off Kansas Highway 7 north of Girard.
    Curran got out and pulled two unconscious victims of the crash out of the car. A deputy arrived three minutes after receiving a call and found the car in flames. Two fire extinguishers had no effect on the blaze, so the deputy asked for help in moving the victims away from the burning car.
    The Currans, the deputy, and others at the scene, including Brad Felter of Girard, helped move the victims further away, putting themselves at risk. Kim Curran reportedly helped assist EMS crews after their arrival.
    The deputy is paid to act in such a situation — but that doesn’t make his actions any less heroic. Felter and the Currans acted because they were needed. None of them particularly wanted to be known for their actions, but their actions deserve to be known.
    Likewise, there are countless told and untold stories from the minutes, hours, and days after the Joplin tornado last year. Many people shared those stories this week as part of the services, remembrances and ceremonies taking place in Joplin.
    Earlier, we described heroism as putting one’s life at risk.
    Consider the tales of packed restaurant freezers and family members holding on as the storm raged on. Consider the stories in the tornado’s aftermath of people charging into unsecured, unstable homes to make sure their friends and loved ones were alright. Consider the heroes who considered their lives secondary to the lives of people they may not have known. Books have been and will be written about these heroes, as the space in this editorial would hardly do these heroes justice.
    Page 2 of 2 - Furthermore, tomorrow is Memorial Day, a holiday created not as an unofficial kickoff to the summer, but instead dedicated to get people to think about the heroes in the military. It is a day dedicated to the heroes who not only put their lives at risk, but forfeited their lives in the pursuit of protecting ours.
    It is a day of reverence and decoration, a day for honoring the heroes in our midst.
    Many, like the Currans and Felter, were just in the right place at the right time to make a difference. Others, like the deputy involved and the veterans across history, have signed up to put themselves in harm’s way.
    Some heroes these days can be found in a nursing home or a hospital, others can be found at a gravesite. Others are living and breathing all around us.
    Some may not even look particularly heroic, but their actions are what defines them.
    Take a moment this weekend and find a hero to honor and recognize.
    —The Morning Sun

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