|
|
|
Morning Sun
  • PATRICK'S PEOPLE: Jared Wilde's Eagle Scout project was a HAZMAT drill

  • When Jared Wilde started thinking about becoming an Eagle Scout, he didn’t have to look far to find role models and helpers.



    The only members of his immediate family who aren’t Eagle Scouts are his mother, Tina Wilde, and his sister, Brittany. However, both of them did help out with his Eagle project.

    • email print
  • When Jared Wilde started thinking about becoming an Eagle Scout, he didn’t have to look far to find role models and helpers.
    The only members of his immediate family who aren’t Eagle Scouts are his mother, Tina Wilde, and his sister, Brittany. However, both of them did help out with his Eagle project.
    “Without my mom, there’s no way I could have gotten this done,” said Wilde, a member of Boy Scout Troop 60, sponsored by the Latter Day Saints Church in Pittsburg.
    He added that his father, Corin Wilde, podiatrist and owner of Wilde’s Foot and Ankle Clinic, helped him earn a lot of merit badges.
    His Eagle Scout project was a hazardous materials decontamination drill, something like a mock disaster, conducted Oct. 3 at Via Christi Hospital.
    “I was asking people for project ideas and talked to Marlene Willis at Via Christi Hospital,” Wilde said. “She pointed me to Karry Moore.”
    Moore, emergency preparedness coordinator at Via Christi, and the young man talked and came up with the idea of the decontamination drill.
    “The scenario was that there was a pool party at Karry’s house and the pool was over-chlorinated, so people started showing up at the hospital,” Wilde explained.
    He said that the drill involved around 25 volunteers and 10 to 15 hospital employees.
    “I’m very grateful to the hospital for letting me do this,” Wilde said.
    The total process lasted from 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
    “We handed out cards to the volunteers that told them the symptoms they were going to have, like vomiting or bleeding from the nose or mouth,” he said. “If they were bleeding, that was painted on them. Then we told them what the project was about and what was going to happen. The hospital employees were debriefed.”
    The drill itself started at 5 p.m.,
    “My duty during the drill was to take notes to see what was going good and what was not so good,” he said. “It went quite smoothly. Then there was a ‘hot wash,’ an evaluation session. It was a lot of fun and I really enjoyed being in charge, knowing that people were looking up  to me.”
    This was definitely a different Eagle project.
    “The review board said they hadn’t heard of this kind of project before,” Wilde said.
    His family was very proud of him, and his mother noted that becoming an Eagle Scout is a difficult and challenging process.
    “One hundred will go in, and only two will finish,” she said.
    Mrs. Wilde said that her son’s Eagle Court of Honor was a very special time for the family.
    “Jared’s grandparents flew in from California,” she said. “Because this is the centennial year for Eagle Scouting, his patch is a little different from the others and says ‘centennial’ on it.”
    Page 2 of 2 - A Pittsburg High School freshman, Wilde is active in student government, the Spanish Club and Drama Club, and sings in PHS Encore.
    “Right now I’m preparing for ‘Breakfast with Santa’ and I’m going to be in ‘The Wedding Singer’,” he said.
    Further down the road, Wilde considers that a medical career could be an option for him.
    “I find it does intrigue me, especially bones and muscles,” he said.

        calendar