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Morning Sun
  • Hartman Hall gets all-new windows

  • Pittsburg State University is continuing its renovation of Hartman Hall. University crews have been working since November to replace all of the windows in the building, many of which were installed when it was constructed in 1929. Workers spent several weeks in July of 2011 replacing the building’s roof and much of the masonry.

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  • Pittsburg State University is continuing its renovation of Hartman Hall. University crews have been working since November to replace all of the windows in the building, many of which were installed when it was constructed in 1929. Workers spent several weeks in July of 2011 replacing the building’s roof and much of the masonry.
    Workers are installing nearly 250 new windows, which have two panes and are insulated with argon gas, said carpentry superintendent Harold Hill.
    “The gas creates a barrier so the cold doesn’t penetrate,” Hill said. “It keeps the moisture and frost from penetrating.”
    They began toward the end of November and have been working steadily ever since. Hill said his crew is able to replace an average of seven windows per day, depending on the size.
    “There are a lot of steps involved just to get one window in,” he said.
    The old windows are difficult to remove, and typically have years worth of old paint and other residue.
    “It’s a challenge to get them out,” Hill said. “We usually have to break them out. All of that brick and mortar is pretty old and it’s hard to get anything to stick.”
    Hill said his crew installed windows on the upper floors first, then worked their way down to lower levels to keep debris from getting stuck in the drying caulk. He said they replaced 52 third floor windows, 127 second floor windows, and have around 70 to replace on the ground level.
    Hartman Hall has a distinguished history that is linked to some of the university’s earliest technology programs, according to information provided by the university. The building is named for Harry Hartman, an alumnus and long-time faculty member in industrial education. Hartman is credited with starting the automotive technical training program, and taught at the university from 1920 until he retired in 1959.
    During World War II, he served as the ground instructor for aviation courses and also helped establish drivers’ education courses in Kansas.
    Hartman drew up the plans for the original building, which is in a neo-Egyptian architectural style popular at the time. His plans were also used for an addition in 1947.
    For much of its life, Hartman Hall housed the university’s automotive technology programs as well as Instructional Media. Since the construction of the Kansas Technology Center in 1997, the building has been home to PSU’s electricians, painters and carpenters. In 2010, the third floor was remodeled to house the Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology. Hartman died in 1981.
     
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