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Morning Sun
  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Let's celebrate Abolition Day

  • Dear Editor,

    Kansas celebrates Abolition Day on January 30.  Abolition Day is the day the death penalty was first abolished in Kansas in 1907.  The death penalty has been struck down and reinstated twice since then, and in 2010 the Kansas Senate came within one vote of replacing it with life without parole.  It is obvious that Kansans have mixed feelings about the death penalty.

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  • Dear Editor,
    Kansas celebrates Abolition Day on January 30.  Abolition Day is the day the death penalty was first abolished in Kansas in 1907.  The death penalty has been struck down and reinstated twice since then, and in 2010 the Kansas Senate came within one vote of replacing it with life without parole.  It is obvious that Kansans have mixed feelings about the death penalty.
    The truth is that the death penalty provides no benefit to Kansans.  
    ---It does not save money.  Death penalty cases cost up to 70% more than non-death penalty cases.  It costs less to keep a person in prison for life than to put them to death.
    ---It does not deter violent crime; a majority of police chiefs agree.   
    ---It does not provide justice or fairness.  Mistakes happen.  Those with money get better legal representation.  There is much evidence that innocent people have been executed.
    What the death penalty does do is prolong the pain and suffering of victim’s families and it creates new victims in the process.  It denies the opportunity for redemption of the perpetrator.  It diverts millions of dollars from services for victim’s families and from crime prevention
    We cannot defend life by taking life.  It is a sign of disrespect for human life.  If murder is wrong, then state sponsored murder is also wrong.
    This year I am celebrating Abolition Day by calling on Governor Brownback and state legislators to repeal the death penalty.
    Sincerely,
    George Weeks
    Pittsburg
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