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Morning Sun
  • County talks health assessments

  • Friday was more than the last day of the month, it was also the last day for residents to complete the online community health assessments.

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  • Friday was more than the last day of the month, it was also the last day for residents to complete the online community health assessments.
    The assessments are a project being done by the eight-county health region, consisting of Crawford, Cherokee, Labette, Montgomery Neosho, Elk, Wilson and Chautauqua counties.
    Janis Goedeke, Crawford County Health officer, said that residents throughout the county have been completing the assessments either in-person or online.
    The results will be compiled in the next few weeks.
    “Greenbush is helping us with that,” Goedeke said. “The results will be ready around mid- to late-September. We’ll know a lot of interesting things through that. What we see in the health field that we think is huge is not necessarily what the community thinks is the biggest problem.”
    Goedeke was actually at the meeting to get commission approval for the county health department to enter an agreement with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. In essence, the health department will provide Early Detection Works screenings for the contracted amount of $125,574.
    Commissioners also spoke with Goedeke about a meeting this week of community health agents in the region.
    Commissioners brought up the issue of pertussis (whooping cough) and whether the county had seen any cases. Goedeke said there was one potential case, but no confirmed cases of pertussis in the county.
    She further said that many teachers in the county were recently given the opportunity to get the tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis vaccine. Commissioner Carl Wood wondered if the same treatment shouldn’t be extended to all county employees.
    “The public takes their health for granted. But you have to be prepared for it if it happened. It might happen, it might not. But you have to be prepared because they will turn to public health departments if it does happen,” Wood said.
    Goedeke said that vaccination could be costly, but could help prevent other costs.
    “If I can prevent one case, that’s worth a lot of money to me,” she said.
    The commission also discussed the growing issue of water rights in the state.
    “People talk about economic development. Water is going to be a big issue in the future,” said commissioner Bob Kmiec. “If we don’t have water, we won’t have business.”
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