The most-used words to describe a new landfill gas-to-energy plant during its ribbon-cutting was “win-win.”

 


The new Oak Grove Power Producers project at the Waste Corporation landfill near Arcadia was officially opened on Friday.

 

The most-used words to describe a new landfill gas-to-energy plant during its ribbon-cutting was “win-win.”
 

The new Oak Grove Power Producers project at the Waste Corporation landfill near Arcadia was officially opened on Friday.
 

Waste Corporation of Kansas, the landfill owner, partnered with Enerdyne Power Systems, Inc. of Matthews, N.C.  to build a 1.6 megawatt power plant fueled by landfill gas from Waste Corporation’s Arcadia operation. The new operating entity of the plant is Oak Grove Power Producers, LLC.
 

“WCA wanted to do more with their landfill gas than just flare it,” said Oak Grove Power Producers LLC manager William Brinker. “They really didn’t have the means to do it.”
 

That is when Enerdyne stepped in to help complete the operation that features a 2,300 horsepower, 20 cylinder Caterpiller 3520 generator which has been altered to accept landfill gas. The generator takes the landfill gas — which is mainly methane — and transforms it into renewable energy that can be used to power up to 1,600 homes.
 

“This uses power technology to use that methane,” said Nicole Cruise, with the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 7 out of Kansas City, Mo. “It helps sustain the environment and reduces methane emissions.”
 

There are six such projects in Kansas that are either completed or in the works and Cruise said, when they are all on-line, they will produce 6.4 megawatts of energy.
 

“It was very important for us to dedicate our resources to this facility to create this type of renewable energy station,” said Waste Corporation Regional Vice President Kevin O’Brien. “This is just a win-win for everyone involved.
 

Kansas City Board of Public Utilities is buying the power, and the power is being “wheeled” to Kansas City. Power goes back to the grid and is used by area consumers, Brinker said. Westar Energy is the contracted interconnect company for the power.
 

“This has truly been a team effort,” said KCBPU President Loretta Columbel. “Everyone worked hard to make this project a reality.”
 

Bill Bider, with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, said that this was a “model” project that can be used for others in Kansas.
 

“This project, maybe more than others in Kansas, shows the benefit of partnership,” Bider said. “This is a great model that is being shown to the rest of the state.
 

“This project is so important because we have other locations that may be sustainable and this may be additional encouragement for them to really get started.”
 

The project also brought in jobs to Crawford County, which was an additional plus for Crawford County Commissioner Linda Grilz.
 

“It also brings in notoriety for the county as well,” Grilz said.