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Morning Sun
  • Patricks People - Against the odds

  • The future was dim a few weeks back for a puppy with a seriously injured leg. Lying on the railroad tracks near the Southeast Kansas Humane Society animal shelter, the dog’s lifespan would probably have been only a few more hours.

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  • The future was dim a few weeks back for a puppy with a seriously injured leg. Lying on the railroad tracks near the Southeast Kansas Humane Society animal shelter, the dog’s lifespan would probably have been only a few more hours.
    “One of our workers, Jason, was on his way home from the shelter when he saw the dog on the tracks and stopped,” said Melissa Glor, society animal welfare director. “He called to the dog, but it didn’t move, so he went over there, scooped it up and brought it to the shelter immediately. We took it to the vet immediately.”
    Dr. Kristal Endicott-Holder of the Girard Medical Center determined that the puppy’s right front leg was crushed, and decided the best option was to amputate the leg.
    “At first we thought the dog had been hit by a train, but now we’re thinking he more likely was caught in a trap,” Glor said. “The vet also said that the injury was probably at least two weeks old because the tendons were wrapping around the bone.”
    She has no idea how Choo Choo, estimated to be about 5 months old, survived in those weeks with his injured leg, but said he seemed to be in otherwise good health when found, and was not too thin.
    “I can’t imagine that any owner would allow their pet to run loose with a crushed leg,” Glor said. “It’s possible he might have been dumped near the shelter, and wandered off.”
    Despite the great pain he must have been suffering, Choo Choo has been nothing but good-natured and affectionate with shelter staff and medical personnel.
    Following surgery, he spent some recovery time in the Glor home.
    “Our other dog, Hoss, was very gentle around him,” Glor said. “It always amazes me how dogs just know when another dog is hurt.”
    She worked with Choo Choo, and he was soon active again, even going up and down steps without difficulty.
    “He should be like a normal dog,” Glor said. “He is going to be a big boy. We think he may be a Labrador - Newfoundland mix.”
    Choo Choo is now at the shelter. He still has some swelling at the surgical site, but is recovering very well and should be ready to go to a good home soon. He has already been neutered.
    Anyone interested in learning more about Choo Choo may call the shelter at 232-1840.
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