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Morning Sun
  • Slick grounds no deterrent at Ice Bowl

  • Disc golf goes on regardless of course conditions, and the Pitt Ice Bowl lived up to its name Saturday.



    The event, which is in its fifth year, still had about average turnout, as people came from the local area and around the region to test their disc golf skills on ice at Schlanger Park.

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  • Disc golf goes on regardless of course conditions, and the Pitt Ice Bowl lived up to its name Saturday.
    The event, which is in its fifth year, still had about average turnout, as people came from the local area and around the region to test their disc golf skills on ice at Schlanger Park.
    The motto is, “No wimps, no whiners,” said Kevin Elrod, president of the Pitt Disc Golf Club.
    He said 14 players were out on the course partway through the event and that they played to support charity and potentially to win prizes from local businesses.
    David Dixon, of Belton, Mo., said he and his son, Noah Dixon, of Joplin and friend Jason Haase, of Joplin, had wanted to try an ice bowl. When one in Fort Scott was canceled, they opted to try the Pittsburg course.
    He said the ice added an additional level of challenge, because the discs don’t stop when they hit the ground.
    “I’ve played in snow before, but never in ice,” he said. “It’s been very, very unforgiving.”
    He said he had been in the creek to rescue his discs three times by the 10th hole and was about six over his expected score at that point.
    “Once in a while you get a soft spot and they will stop,” he said of the discs.
    “It’s a sad situation,” added Haase.
    All three also said this was the first time they had played the course, where Chris Dettling and James Lakey, both of Pittsburg, and Chad Shaw, of Miami, said the ice wasn’t hampering their game.
    Dettling is the vice president of the Pitt Disc Golf Club and said the Schlanger Park course just opened last summer, but that he and others are out practicing several times a week.
    He said his group was using the icy conditions to its advantage.
    “It’s actually helping us,” he said.
    Dettling said ultimately the event helps support great area charities, including Wesley House and Project Warmth, and those involved in the event said it is fun to play for good causes.
    Elrod said the entry fee is $15 and 10 cans of food or $25 cash, and he said all cash goes to Project Warmth and all the food goes to Wesley House. In return, participants had the opportunity to win prizes from several local businesses
    “A lot of your bigger ice bowls, you play, but don’t expect anything. You’re playing for charity,” Elrod said.
    He said final counts of funds and food volumes will be known next week, but in the first four years have totaled 74 participants, $1,288 for Project Warmth and 658 pounds of food for Wesley House.

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