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Morning Sun
  • PATRICK'S PEOPLE: Art students at PCMS made sculptures out of snow

  • Editor’s Note: Nikki Patrick was off on Saturday. Today’s Patrick’s People was written by Andrew Nash.



    The Pittsburg Community Middle School lawn quickly turned into a menagerie of creatures and objects this week.

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  • Editor’s Note: Nikki Patrick was off on Saturday. Today’s Patrick’s People was written by Andrew Nash.
    The Pittsburg Community Middle School lawn quickly turned into a menagerie of creatures and objects this week.
    Students in Katie Grosdidier’s art classes may have spent Tuesday playing in the snow, but when they got back to school, they were turning the piles of snow into works of art.
    “I’ve done this project in the past in Olathe. It was a spur of the moment thing when we had a 20-inch snow in the past,” said Grosdidier, a first-year teacher at PCMS.
    Crayons, dogs, penguins, turtles, crocodiles, volcanoes, and yes, even dragons, were crafted out of the snow using shovels, buckets, and more by the students.
    “It turned out really successful,” Grosdidier said. “We do a lot of studying of shapes and how shape makes objects. They were tasked with making animals featuring shapes. We spray them with food coloring. I’m a huge recycler, so I had a ton of spray bottles.”
    At the end of Friday, Grosdidier had said that her sixth grade first hour and eighth grade eighth hour were tied for the most creative displays and that she was having a hard time deciding between the two.
    “The winning class gets cookies on Monday,” she said.
    Her classes spent Thursday and had the option of working on the snow sculptures on Friday. Most opted to finish their work.
    “The first day, I brought in as many pairs of gloves as I could, and every scarf I could find. Everyone knew to bring their coats and winter gear. I wanted to make sure they had a plan of action,” she said. “Some enjoy this more than others. You’d figure the Johnson County girls would have been more sensitive to the cold. But I’m finding that here in coal country, a more rural area, there are some that aren’t as hardened to the weather.”
    Ultimately, the prospect of putting color and shape onto snow drifts got most of the students involved.
    “It forces some of the quiet kids to pick it up and figure it out,” Grosdidier said. “They really have to move. It’s really just 40-45 minutes to build and spray paint before the end of class.”

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