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Morning Sun
  • City hears street repair plans

  • In fall of 2010, Pittsburg voters approved a sales tax that was dedicated to the repair and maintenance of city streets. Now, in the spring of 2013, commissioners are getting a look at what’s been done lately and what’s coming with the funds generated by that sales tax.

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  • In fall of 2010, Pittsburg voters approved a sales tax that was dedicated to the repair and maintenance of city streets. Now, in the spring of 2013, commissioners are getting a look at what’s been done lately and what’s coming with the funds generated by that sales tax.
    “It’s kind of a spur-of-the-moment type of deal,” said Bill Beasley, Pittsburg Public Works Director. “We wanted to show you where we’re at and where we’re going. We’ve already started the 2013 projects, and I wanted to visit about what we’ve been doing in the last year, and then what we’re doing this year.”
    Beasley noted the completion of an asphalt overlay in the Timber Hills subdivision in the northeast sector of Pittsburg. Another road, Georgia Street from Memorial Drive to Quincy, came in a bit under budget because one less block than expected was completed.
    As for current projects, Beasley identified one particular area, just south and east of the Rouse/4th streets intersection. To be specific, Fairview and Highland streets will be overlain with asphalt from First to Fourth streets, and Water Street will be done from First to 12th streets. Finally, First and Second streets will be overlain with asphalt from Rouse to Water streets.
    Further down the line in 2013, Beasley identified Walnut Street from Third to Quincy streets as in need of new ADA-compliant sidewalk ramps, storm inlet upgrades, milling, and an asphalt overlay. The same plan is in the works, minus the storm inlet upgrades, on Joplin Street from Fourth to Sixth streets and from Eighth to 20th streets.
    Seventh Street is also slated for work, with new ADA-compliant sidewalk ramps and an asphalt overlay stretching in a combined three projects from Water Street all the way to Joplin Street. Grand Oaks subdivision is slated for an asphalt overlay, as well as Hudson Street from Broadway to Olive.
    Beasley further spoke of an asphalt milling and overlay project planned for Quincy Street from Joplin to Rouse, and a complete concrete panel replacement for S. Joplin Street near Pittsburg State University (between Carlton and Cleveland streets). The same sort of concrete panel replacement will take place in part at the Rouse and Quincy street intersection.
    Finally, Beasley spoke of a plan to use a preservative sealant called Reclamite to extend the life of pavement by 5-7 years, focusing first on the streets more recently completed, like 23rd, 22nd, Tucker, Fourth and Ford streets.
    All told in 2013, the asphalt projects add up to roughly $533,000 in repair, the Reclamite will total about $40,000, and the ADA-compliant ramps will cost another $150,000. When combined with about $177,000 in concrete street repair, that totals the $900,000 Beasley expects to be spent in 2013.
    Beasley also announced a number of projects being considered for 2014, including projects along portions of Rouse, Olive, Twin Lakes Drive, Stilwell, Madison, Locust, 16th, 17th, 18th, Elm, 24th, and 25th streets, as well as 24th Terrace.
    Page 2 of 2 - Furthermore, the city commission passed the use of about $207,000 in street sales tax funds to pay for their portion of a KLINK resurfacing project along Broadway from 11th to 19th streets in fiscal year 2015. The total cost of the project is set for about $407,000. Based upon the city’s size, the max it can receive in state grant funds is $200,000.
    In other action Tuesday, the city commission:
    • heard a bimonthly budget update from City Finance Director Jamie Clarkson. In short, the sales tax collections are up 5.24 percent compared to the same period last year, and the public utility revenue is down 2.68 percent, over the same period last year. The latter, Clarkson said, is because the wet spring meant fewer people need as much water for their yards.
    The city is in the black at roughly the 1/3 mark.
    “Right now, everything is looking pretty good,” said City Manager Daron Hall.
    • approved an application for a $12,000 Phase I engineering grant from the Kansas Department of Transportation Safe Routes to Schools project.
    • approved a refinancing of certain bonds in order to save the city about $82,000 this year and about $151,000 over the next nine years.
    • heard a public comment from Ray Ryan, who assists the city in its insurance dealings. Ryan said that the city received $7,000 in dividends during a short-term program with its new insurance provider, EMC. Extrapolated over a full year, which the city is now on, there may be dividends twice as large to help offset the insurance costs in the future, Ryan said.
     

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