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Morning Sun
  • Soil district hosts annual meeting

  • Crawford County’s agricultural community celebrated conservation efforts Saturday evening, despite being in the midst of uncertain times.



    The awarding of signs for outstanding conservation efforts during the Crawford County Conservation District 66th annual meeting was bookended by reports on the politics of the program, from the local level on up.

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  • Crawford County’s agricultural community celebrated conservation efforts Saturday evening, despite being in the midst of uncertain times.
    The awarding of signs for outstanding conservation efforts during the Crawford County Conservation District 66th annual meeting was bookended by reports on the politics of the program, from the local level on up.
    “We have to celebrate the accomplishments of those who care for farms and natural resources,” said Rod Vorhees of Wilson County, who is the chairman of the State Conservation Commission Board of Directors. “We need to recognize the tremendous accomplishments the stewards of the land give.”
    Vorhees said the care and conservation of resources is vital and a never-ending project.
    “We borrow from future generations when we use natural resources,” he said. “We will never be finished with caring for our resources. It’s an ongoing thing.”
    Each property owner recognized and awarded during the evening has been intentional about playing a role in conservation.
    Greg Bogina said his grandpa began conservation work in 1928 on land that later passed to him, and the original plan was showcased as Greg and Tracey Bogina were presented with the Kansas Bankers’ Award for Soil Conservation.
    “I really thought it was a tribute to my Grandpa,” Bogina said.
    Jerry and Rosemary Simon, along with Ronnie Simon and Sharon Daniels, were awarded the Continued Conservation Award which recognizes continued care for land that has previously been recognized with awards.
    The Grassland Conservation Award went to Fred and Marjorie Giefer, who said when he was in high school the water turned red with dirt each time it rained.
    Throughout his lifetime, he has sought to leave the land better for future generations.
    “I’ve always enjoyed and always taken pleasure in putting in soil-saving practices,” he said.
    He said the Grassland Conservation Award completes his collection, which also includes the Bankers’ and Continued awards, among others.
    Poster contest winners also were honored.
    Winners in the senior division were: grand champion Jake Beckmann, reserve champion Trent Born, honorable mentions  Hannah Murphy, Bailey Rhuems and Bria Ginivan, all of Frank Layden Elementary.
    Winners in the junior division were: grand champion Adison O’Hara, reserve champion Hannah Eckstein, honorable mentions Kayla Garner and Alina Kukovich, all of Frank Layden Elementary and honorable mention Kassandra Burns of George Nettels Elementary.
    Vorhees also talked about proposed legislation dealing with conservation districts and the challenges that continued funding cuts could bring.
    “We strive to continue to let local conservation districts have the flexibility and authority to implement programming on the local level,” he said.
    He said proposed cuts may become reality, but that can be dealt with.
    “We have a plan in place and that is something we need to work on,” he said.
    Page 2 of 2 - “These challenges that we’re facing certainly do involve funding,” he added.
    Ronnie Brown, who said he is the director of Area 5, also spoke about the work he is doing for conservation on the national level. He said consolidation efforts have hurt conservation programs in areas where offices were merged and that the efforts on the national level do help to funnel back money for local programming.
    “I’m proud of all the work we’ve done,” Brown said.
    Those attending the meeting also elected Janice Harryman as a district supervisor. Harryman will take the place of Sally Imhof, who chose not to seek re-election.

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