For those who might be interested in pecan production, Jacob Weber and I have scheduled a pecan grafting school for Monday, April 26, beginning at 1:30 p.m. It will be held on the Brent Bitner farm located at 1108 S. 220th St just south of Pittsburg. This school will be taught by Dr. Bill Reid, who is the researcher at the K-State Research and Extension Pecan Research field at Chetopa.      

For those who might be interested in pecan production, Jacob Weber and I have scheduled a pecan grafting school for Monday, April 26, beginning at 1:30 p.m. It will be held on the Brent Bitner farm located at 1108 S. 220th St just south of Pittsburg. This school will be taught by Dr. Bill Reid, who is the researcher at the K-State Research and Extension Pecan Research field at Chetopa.       
      
Bill will lead a hands-on demonstration of the techniques that can be used for propagating improved pecan cultivars. Those attending the grafting school will have the chance to practice grafting before going home to graft their own trees.

For those who are unfamiliar with grafting, this is an age old horticultural technique that can be defined as attaching a twig from one tree to the stem of another in such a way that the twig continues to grow and becames a parmanent part of the other tree.  All of the branches that grow from that twig will have the identical characteristics of the tree from which the twig was taken.

Grafting wood from a tree that produces high quality nuts onto a seedling tree is the only way to guarantee that your trees will produce superior nuts. Grafting also promotes earlier nut production. Trees growing from planted nuts usually take 15 to 20 years to begin to produce nuts. However, by grafting, you can reduce that time to just 3 or 4 years.So if you have pecan trees that might be suitable for grafting or are just curious about the process,  plan to attend the grafting school on April 26. No reservations are necessary.                       

Beef Cattle and Forage Crops Field Day

This field day is scheduled for Thursday, May 6 and will be held at the Mound Valley Unit of the KSU Southeast Agricultural Research Center. The Mound Valley unit is located 2.5 miles west of Mound Valley on highway 160 (formerly K-96) then one fourth mile south on Elk Road. The meeting will start with registration at 8:30 a.m.with the presentations beginning at 9:00 a.m.      
      
Joe Moyer, forage agronomist at the center, will talk about Switchgrass Cultivars for Biofuel Production. Dr. Justin Waggoner, Southwest Area Extension Livestock specialist, will talk about Wet Distiller’s Grain Storage. Dr. Doug Shoup, Southeast Area Extension Agronomist, will talk about Optimizing Hay Quality. Dr. Lyle Lomas, Livestock Researcher and Head at the center, will discuss Distillers Grains as a Nutrient Source for Grazing Cattle. Dr. Dan Thomson, K-State College of Veterinary Medicine, will discuss  Managing High Risk Calves in Stocker and Feeder Operations.

A sponsored meal will be served after the meeting.