|
|
|
Morning Sun
  • County burn ban still in effect

  • Since Crawford County Commissioners put the county burn ban into place on July 6, Pittsburg has received 2.07 inches of rain. Unfortunately, more than 1.54 of that came on July 7.



    Although there has been rain in the county, it hasn’t been much, with Pittsburg not recording any more than .15 inches of rain since that July 7 storm.

    • email print
  • Since Crawford County Commissioners put the county burn ban into place on July 6, Pittsburg has received 2.07 inches of rain. Unfortunately, more than 1.54 of that came on July 7.
    Although there has been rain in the county, it hasn’t been much, with Pittsburg not recording any more than .15 inches of rain since that July 7 storm.
    There have also been 16 days of temperatures above 100 degrees since the burn ban was enacted.
    Perhaps because temperatures have dipped below the century mark, but county commissioners have noticed more alerts of people burning in the county despite the burn ban still being in place.
    “It seems like people are getting a little anxious now,” said commissioner Carl Wood. “People went out [Monday] night and had a controlled burn. They thought the burn ban was up, I guess. But the ban is still on. If it continues to get worse, we’ll have to send in the sheriffs to get involved.”
    Wood said that Monday’s burn was not the first in the last week, and that he’s driven past a number of people burning brush. He said that the county doesn’t want people to burn, even if it is being carefully watched.
    “It’s a dangerous situation. That one burn was a quarter mile from where I’ve got 150 bales of hay. People have to be more careful about what they’re doing,” Wood said. “They need to be thinking. I’m not going to be critical of it anymore, but people have got to use common sense.”
    The commission also spent time discussing scheduling issues around the canvassing of the fall election.
    According to new state law, canvassing must either be done on the Monday or the Thursday on the week after the election.
    “That is part of the new voter ID law. It was an amendment on the floor of the House, and nobody paid attention to it, because of the voter ID and proof of citizenship issues,” said County Clerk Don Pyle.
    However, the Monday after the election is Veterans Day, a day in which the county courthouse has traditionally been closed. A Kansas Association of Counties conference is scheduled for Tuesday through Thursday of that week, further complicating the issue.
    Ultimately, commissioners decided to open the courthouse long enough on Monday to get their business done, and Pyle said he could have provisional ballots ready by that date.
    “Of the choices we have, I’d prefer to go Monday. No matter how many provisionals we have, we can work through the weekend and get them ready for Monday. It’ll probably be the only thing we open the courthouse for,” Pyle said.
    In other action, the commission:
    • approved the Crawford County Health Department seeking bids for an electronic sign in front of its grounds.
    Page 2 of 2 - • went into executive session for about 30 minutes for matters of non-elected personnel.
    • talked about the potential of purchasing or looking into a portable carport to protect a piece of county equipment.

        calendar