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Morning Sun
  • PATRICK'S PEOPLE: Jamil Hendricks is in Washington as an intern for Men Can Stop Rape

  • Jamil Hendricks, Pittsburg State University psychology major from Kansas City, Mo., was thrilled with the opportunity to spend the summer as an intern for Men Can Stop Rape in Washington, D.C.

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  • Jamil Hendricks, Pittsburg State University psychology major from Kansas City, Mo., was thrilled with the opportunity to spend the summer as an intern for Men Can Stop Rape in Washington, D.C.
    “Social justice is something I’m very passionate about, making sure that everyone is treated equally,” he said in a telephone interview from the nation’s capital.
    He is one of 12 participants in the Ethnic Minority Young Adult Summer Internship program of the United Methodist General Board of Church and Society. All are working in nonprofit and non-governmental social justice organizations in Washington, D.C.
    Interns are housed at George Washington University, attend church together each Sunday and meet for weekly devotions and Bible studies.
    “I arrived here  on May 29, and I’ll be back in Kansas City on Aug. 3,” Hendricks said.
    He’s happy to be working with Men Can Stop Rape.
    “In their mission statement they say they want men to use their strength to create a culture free from violence, including violence against women,” he said.
    The organization, founded in 1997, pioneered this way of addressing the epidemic of violence against women. While the majority of violent acts against women are committed by men, the vast majority of prevention efforts are risk-reduction and self-defense tactics directed at women. The founders of Men Can Stop Rape wanted to  shift responsibility of deterring harm away from women by promoting healthy, nonviolent masculinity. The aim is to engage men as allies and inspire them to feel motivated and capable to end men’s violence against women.
    “A lot of what I’ve been doing is helping get ready for a yearly Healthy Masculinity conference July 24, 25 and 26,” Hendricks said.
    Those attending the training event will have three days of discussions, interactive group exercises, role-playing and multimedia presentations.
    “Afterward they will be better able to talk to young men about what healthy masculinity looks like,” Hendricks said.
    He added that the interns have also been looking at how colleges and universities use federal funding to prevent violence on their campuses.
    Interns also met with various Washington, D.C., dignitaries, and Hendricks had a very special treat Friday when he met with U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II, who represents Missouri’s Fifth District.
    “He is my representative and he was also senior  pastor back home at my church, St. James United Methodist Church,” Hendricks said. “It was good to see him again. The first thing he did when he saw me was give me a big old hug, and he told me he’s proud of me.”
    His faith is a vital part of who Hendricks is, and he’s currently very active in Gorilla Wesley, the PSU United Methodist Campus Ministry. It was campus minister Josh Gooding who received information on the internship opportunity and passed it on to Hendricks.
    Page 2 of 2 - “I’m a participant in the weekly Monday night worship service, sometimes preach in the service  and lead small group meetings,” Hendricks said. “I want to become an ordained United Methodist minister.”
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