|
|
|
Morning Sun
  • The Four States Farm Show runs the gamut of products, attendees

  • It seemed strange for a vendor to be selling outdoor furnaces at the Four States Farm Show on Friday. With temperatures in the upper 90s, only a light breeze and a sweltering heat, it almost felt as though attendees and vendors were already in an outdoor furnace.

    • email print
  • It seemed strange for a vendor to be selling outdoor furnaces at the Four States Farm Show on Friday. With temperatures in the upper 90s, only a light breeze and a sweltering heat, it almost felt as though attendees and vendors were already in an outdoor furnace.
    But the traditional — and ever-present — heat didn't detract from the flood of visitors, vendors and more at the Four States Farm Show. One vendor said the crowds were just as big as ever up until the hotter hours of the day.
    "We've already sold several things this morning. That's a good sign. We've met a lot of people from last year, and they've come back and commented on the product. We've had good feedback both ways," said Davie Russell, Carthage, Mo.
    In one corner of the farm show on Friday, there were live animals, like brahmousins and angus cattle. In another corner is the barbecue, or perhaps the famous pineapple whip. The lawnmower testing area is over in another area, while seemingly everywhere, there are farm implements, tractors, combines, hay equipment, and more both to be sold and already sold.
    “We came out for mowers and wood furnaces. It’s been a good afternoon,” said Dennis DeSilva, Miami, Okla. “They make it as easy as possible to find everything here. We’ve seen lawnmowers and things like that. I have a small tractor. There are parts for that are just readily available to buy.”
    Vendors said that the event attracts so many because it’s not targeted toward the farmer with hundreds of acres of land. Rather, there are many products and machines that can help even the most inexperienced person who works on and with the land. That variety helps keep the crowds out at the farm show all weekend.
    “A lot of people have just 20 cows or 30 cows. Some of the equipment here makes it easier for them to do their job. It’s safer and easier,” Russell said. “There’s a lot of stuff to see. A lot of times, it’s really rolling at 7:30 a.m. and gradually drops off. That’s not the case this year. It was packed until after the lunch hour, when it really got hot.”
    Greg Samuel, Seymour, Mo., with Portable Livestock Shelters, was talking to many of his regular customers on Friday, and said there’s a lot to see and do for those both expert and inexperienced on the farm.
    “We have severall retired guys, who have just a few of this or that, or where someone’s parents buy this type of stuff for their kids,” Samuel said, referring to the chicken coops he brought to the show. “This catches their eyes as something they can handle and afford.”
    Page 2 of 2 - Samuel said that in the shade as the mid-afternoon sun bore down on the farm show. Many water stations, fans, and ways to cool down are scattered throughout the show to help deal with the heat.
    “It’s going to be hot regardless. It was hot last year, and it’s hot now,” Samuel said.
        • »  EVENTS CALENDAR