When Logan Falletti graduates from Frontenac High School in May, she’ll leave something of herself behind at the school, especially on the stage.



“There’s literally blood, sweat and tears on that stage,” Falletti said. “I’ve cried, bled and sweat on that stage.”

When Logan Falletti graduates from Frontenac High School in May, she’ll leave something of herself behind at the school, especially on the stage.

“There’s literally blood, sweat and tears on that stage,” Falletti said. “I’ve cried, bled and sweat on that stage.”

One three daughters of Chris and Ann Falletti, she’s a lifetime — so far —  Frontenac resident who started school in Frontenac kindergarten.

“I did go to Colgan one year for forensics, debate and speech,” she said. “My first ever high school  play was there, a production of the ‘Wizard of Oz’. When I came back to Frontenac High School, they said they’d try to start a forensics team.”

The school did, and since then Falletti has been leading that effort. She has also been deeply involved with “Kids Teaching Kids.” She explained that when sixth graders were taken into the junior high school, they were too young to participate in junior high activities sanctioned by the state association.

“They wanted to start other clubs for them, and I think about eight clubs were started,” Falletti said. “My theater club is  the only one still going. The first year we did an original play that I wrote, and all the sixth graders were in it.”

Now the yearly production is open to all junior high students, and professionally written plays have been produced under Falletti’s direction. Her younger sisters, Corine, 13, and Julia, 11, have been involved.

One of her plays made a $283 profit.

Right now Falletti is working on “Death by Dessert,” a mystery written by Nathan Hartwick. It will be presented at 7  p.m. Jan. 22 and 23 at the school.

“It’s so cute, and we’re doing it as a dinner theater,”  Falletti said. “It’s kind of a Romeo and Juliet story, with a bus boy and a bus girl who work at rival Italian restaurants. Then the landlord who owns the building shows up dead, and they have to solve the mystery.”

She said there are 23 students in the production.

“I  placed everybody who tried out for it,” Falletti said. “There are 18 speaking roles, two non-speaking roles and five servers for the food.”

Some people might think that the small roles aren’t important, but the director said that’s simply not true here.
“It’s the small parts that make it really funny and bring the big parts together,” Falletti said. “The non-speaking roles and the servers are a very big  part of the show.”

She said that some cast members are new to the stage.

“Some of them had stage fright, and I drilled it out of them,” Falletti said. “Some of them had such soft voices, so I made them yell.”

She knows all about stage fright, because she suffered from it herself for many years. Then, when she was in eighth grade, she became part of the Pittsburg Family YMCA Triple Threat performance group, directed by Shelley VanShaar.

“We performed in Branson, and opened for two shows,” Falletti said. “That was when I decided this was for me.”

After her graduation, she plans to study theater at Kansas State University.

“I just signed up for housing and food, so it’s official,” she said. “I have to live there.”

Her goal is a career in live performance.

“We get tapes of the shows we’re in, and I’ve never watched one of them, I can’t stand to see it,” Falletti said. “I can’t see me making movies.”

She’s not sure who will take over her junior high theater club when she’s off in Manhattan, and thinking about that is enough to provoke more tears.

Falletti would rather talk about “Death by Dessert,” which she said has gotten excellent support.

“I wrote Patricia Terlip that, after we paid for scripts and royalties, we had $7.50 left, so she sent us a $500 check,” Falletti said. “The Booster Club is paying for the food for the dinner theater.”

She thinks the play should be especially enjoyed in Frontenac.

“It’s a little bit about staying true to my roots,” Falletti said. “These are Italian restaurants in the play, and I’m Italian, and this town loves food. I think it’s a good note to end on.”

She thinks being in theater will be good for the students, even those who aren’t planning careers on the stage.

“I think it makes you more articulate, and helps you take leadership roles later on in life,” Falletti said.