Seth Golay has come back to his roots, temporarily.

Now living in the Kansas City area, Golay left Pittsburg to pursue a career in show business, especially musical theater. Now he’s back home in Pittsburg Memorial Auditorium for a cameo appearance as radio announcer Bert Healy in the Pittsburg Community Theatre production of “Annie.”

Seth Golay has come back to his roots, temporarily.

Now living in the Kansas City area, Golay left Pittsburg to pursue a career in show business, especially musical theater. Now he’s back home in Pittsburg Memorial Auditorium for a cameo appearance as radio announcer Bert Healy in the Pittsburg Community Theatre production of “Annie.”

The show will be presented at 7:30 p.m. today through Saturday and with matinee performances at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in Pittsburg Memorial Auditorium. Tickets will be $12 for adults, $10 for students and senior citizens and $8 for general admission balcony. They may be purchased at the auditorium box office, by calling 231-7827 or online.

Golay was in a PCT production of “Annie” in 1992. Also in it was Linden Little, now employed at Pittsburg Memorial Auditorium.

“It was my first show, but  Lin had been in six shows already,” Golay  said. “I’ve been trying to catch up with him since then. I played the sound effects man in the radio studio, the one who held up the applause sign.”

Golay remembers that Little helped him learn to read vocal scores for the  show.

“I had played trombone for a number of years, so I could read music, but  not vocal scores,” Golay  said. “And the scores that we had were all hand-written.”

Little, now assistant technical director at Pittsburg Memorial Auditorium,  played a news boy back then. He designed the set for the current production.

“This one was a lot of fun to design,” he said. “For this show, you either do nothing, just have some tables and chairs, or  do everything. Director Greg Shaw and I decided we wanted to do a lot. We tried to put a city on stage.”

One theme of the design was based on the fact that the  show  is based on a comic strip.

“Everything is a rectangle,” Little said.

Golay, who has performed extensively in  the Kansas City area and also had a stint in New York, said  he was impressed by the growth made by PCT.

“It was a pretty  put-together organization before, but it’s taken leaps and bounds in its production values,” he said. “It’s been good to  grow up and then come back and see this. To  come back and visit your  roots, it’s important.”

Golay also had a Tropical Sno stand for  several years, and then was asked by the company if he would consider a position as a dealer relationship manager with the company. Now he visits those applying for franchises in nine states, which rules out long-term theatrical commitments, but doesn’t keep him totally  off the stage.

“The job pays the rent, and allows me time to come back and do things like this,” Golay said. “I’ve also got a show, ‘The Nervous Set,’ coming up in the fall at Lawrence.”