The want for a shot clock at the high school level has to wait for another year. The National High School Federation announced the proposal for an implementation of the shot clock failed.


There are now nine current states which use an active shot clock, Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, Rhode Island, North and South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin, and California, with Arkansas and Washington starting in 2020-21.


The actual vote was not made public by the NFHS.


"Information was given to the Basketball Rules Committee that shared the votes in individual states on how coaches and officials voted in support of or non-support of the shot clock rule," NFHS Director of Sports and Liaison to the Basketball Rules Committee Theresia Wynns said in a statement. "The conversation among the committee members explored the pros and cons of enacting the proposal as a rule for all states and likewise for state adoption. The committee will continue to explore the shot clock issue."


The NFHS said one of the reasons against the shot clock is about the monetary issue. With the cost of the initial shot clock and paying someone to operate the table. The shot clock can start out as low as $6,000 and can reach north of $20,000 depending on how old the previous wiring and equipment is. Then, the cost of paying an extra table worker to run the shot clock.


“Outside of our first season with the shot clock, we have not had many complaints about errors in their use,” South Dakota Assistant Executive Director Joe Auch said. “We put out a crash course for officials and table workers.”


When an official has to stop, reset the shot clock and put or take off time, those seconds add up to minutes and we have not begun to add it into other functions of the game.


The cost might be the most prohibiting thing to KSHSAA adopting a shot clock. While the shot clocks themselves start just over $5,000, on the personnel side, that can add up.


The NFHS voting shot down the proposal state organizations, such as the KSHSAA, to adopt a shot clock if they wanted.